Sign Us Up: 8 Newsletters That We Cannot WAIT to Open

image

We know—you’re probably trying to clean out your inbox, to find that always-elusive unsubscribe button. But hold up for just one minute ‘cause there are actually a handful of newsletters that we think you should absolutely, without-a-doubt be getting and (how about this?) reading. They’re stuffed with smarty-pants tips and intel that will make you feel savvier, more informed, and just generally less daunted by all the things—well, at least that’s the effect they’ve had on us. —erica

+ theSkimm
This is like magic: It ensures you have all the news (like, hard news about Ukraine, ebola, Pope Francis) that you need to start each day. We feel like we owe the girls who masterminded this a thank-you note. 

+ Ann Friedman
Not only does Ann Friedman write all kinds of things we love (for New York mag, The Hairpin, and Elle), but she also puts together a beyond-brilliant Friday rundown of all of the stuff on the internet you want to know about but don’t yet.

+ The Business of Fashion
Our go-to for fashion news, from the breaking stuff to longer, thoughtful features and interviews…

+ Uncommon Update
…And the other source we turn to daily to make sure we know what’s up in the sartorial realm. 

+ 20x200
This site, which sells limited-edition prints, is the one that inspired ours, so obviously we’re diehards. And once you start reading the stories behind its art, you will be too.

+ Lauren in the Afternoon
IRL, we’re always asking Lauren Sherman what she’s into and what she’s contemplating, so we were stoked when she started delivering a digest of her weekly reading and writing to our inboxes.

+ Now I Know
Do you love lifelong-learning? Do you heart knowing obscure things about equally random topics? Sign up.

+ A Series of Tubes
This is, like, the chillest beauty newsletter imaginable. Amanda Mattos just gets it.

Listen, not to get all self-promoter-y, but a lot of people tell us that the Of a Kind newsletter makes them feel all giddy like Lucille Bluth up there. Are you signed up, or what?

comments, reblogs & likes

Notes

23 notes

Of a Kind

Um, no, it is not too late in the season for this Thomas Sires jumper. Because how thrilled will you be to be able to toss it on with a blazer in October and to not have to shave your legs? —erica

comments, reblogs & likes

Notes

11 notes

In Character: Raylan Givens

image

image

image

If you’re never seen Justified, you probably don’t truly understand the appeal of Timothy Olyphant. But give this show three episodes, and, well, you’ll be right there with me—100% chance. —erica

image

A Gitman Vintage shirt that often ends up in a crumpled pile on his motel-room floor.

image

A black tie from Kris Van Assche to show those Crowders that he’s serious about this U.S. Marshal business.

image

A signature cowboy hat by Goorin Bros. that is worth getting into a bar brawl over.

Get your “In Character” fix!

comments, reblogs & likes

Notes

5 notes

Of a Kind

Motif of this No.6 dress: the Catskills. —erica

comments, reblogs & likes

Notes

5 notes

Of a Kind

Bridle Leather Bifold Wallet by M&U Co. for Of a Kind

BUY / 50 of a kind / $89

comments, reblogs & likes

Notes

13 notes

Double Take: Driftwood

image

If your tan game is as weak as mine, the only way to bring summer into the fall is by literally carrying it with you. Let this candelabra, by The Dreslyn, take over your dining table, or hang a garland, c/o Jamali Garden, by your window to distract you when the leaves start to turn. Salty air (unfortunately) not included. —alex ronan

WOOD you like some more of this? You got it.

comments, reblogs & likes

Notes

3 notes

Of a Kind

Is this gonna be the year that I wear a felt hat? Clyde makes a mighty strong case. —erica

comments, reblogs & likes

Notes

16 notes

Weather Vain: Silver Lake, Los Angeles, California - 87 and Partly Cloudy

image

We were in L.A. last week, and you know the one thing we don’t like about that place? Leaving. Wah. Here’s a getup that’s itching to head to all of our right-off-the-101 haunts. —erica

Clockwise from top left:

+ A Kieley Kimmel top ready to hit the boutiques around The Junction.

+ A piece of cool-girl fine jewelry from the L.A. sisters behind Gabriela Artigas.

Proud Mary loafers comfy enough to stand in line at Sqirl.

Damir Doma culottes that are ready to catch any breeze that comes their way.

+ A Job & Boss wallet-slash-clutch that won’t weigh you down at L&E Oyster Bar.

Head here for a whole lot more “Weather Vain.”

comments, reblogs & likes

Notes

3 notes

Of a Kind

The twisty-twirly waist and the quilting on those pockets there makes for a real interesting denim dress, by Heinui. —erica

comments, reblogs & likes

Notes

45 notes

Step Inside M&U Co.’s Pennsylvania Tannery

150 years of experience is nothing to sneeze at.

When it comes to sourcing leather for their wallets, M&U Co.’s Hunter Craighill and Nathan Gryszowka don’t mess around. “We like knowing where the leather comes from and how it’s produced,” says Hunter. And for them, that means working exclusively with Wickett & Craig, a tannery in Curwensville, Pennsylvania, that’s been at it since 1867. “They’re one of two vegetable tanneries in North America, and they produce the best quality that I’ve seen.” Hunter talks us through all that happens there below. —alisha prakash

image

“We use a quality that’s called bridle leather. It’s the hardest-working and most flexible leather. When the cowhides come into the tannery, they still have hair on them, so they’re soaked in baths that de-hair them.”

image

“Then the pieces go to the tan yard, which is a series of big baths. Here, you’re basically converting the animal skin into leather. I don’t think they change the water—the tanning liquid gets better with age.”

image

“From the tan yard, our leather goes on to be dyed. They tumble the hides in big barrels with a lot of dye. They come out dripping in dye and have to be hung to dry.”

image

“Then the hides are hot-stuffed. They’re put into these oak barrels—these things rotate and get heated up. The hides are soaked and tumbled in tallows and oils to create a nice, finished leather that won’t dry and crack over time.”

image

“After the hides are hot-stuffed, they go on to be waxed. This is the leather after it has been waxed. The final waxing makes the leather tougher but also allows a patina to come out. It’s like nice denim: When you buy it, it’s pristine and stiff, but as it wears in, it gets a character of its own.”

image

“This is the finished bridle leather, at its full thickness.”

image

“Our leather gets split to make it thinner. Natural cowhides can be between 1/8 inch and ¼ inch thick, and we want it as thin as possible, closer to 1/32 inch thick. They keep the outside face of the leather and cut into the interior side.”

image

“We like a darker inside to contrast slightly with the color of face of the leather, so we have the tannery spray a darker dye on the inside after it has been split and re-finished.”

image

“This is M&U’s fall order packed up. We ordered a few different colors—it’s probably 24 sides of leather. A side is half of a full cow, which is typically how leather is sold.”

Wait ‘til you see what the guys made with this leather—come back tomorrow to get their edition!

comments, reblogs & likes

Notes

6 notes