Double Take: Rock Steady

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If you need proof that rocking chairs aren’t just for little old ladies on front porches, how’s about these two? There’s the smart-looking Félix from the Belgian designer Frédéric Richard and the less angular—but no less awesome—Savannah III designed by the Brit Jolyon Yates. They both, well, rock. —alex ronan

Ready to sit back and take in more “Double Take?” Here ya go.

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Of a Kind

Yes, you still want a leopard-print dress. And, yes, it should be this Loup one. —erica

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Weather Vain: Ojai, California - 81 and Clear

Judging by what’s showing up in my Instagram feed, Ojai is the new Palm Springs. And if you’re not quite ready to say goodbye to summer temps, you should probably be saying “oh, HI” to Ojai right now. —erica

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Clockwise from top left: 

+ Jeffrey Campbell boots-slash-mules in dusty, Ojai Racho Inn colors.

+ A very in-from-L.A. slip dress, c/o Organic by John Patrick.

+ A Rundholz sweater—in case the air’s a little crisp for a morning farmers’ market stroll.

+ A ring from Unearthen that’s jazzy enough for a dinner—with a wine flight?—at Azu.

+ An Eayrslee clutch to tuck under your arm while you shop (outdoors!) at Bart’s Books.

+ For strolling around Summer Camp and Modern Folk, this Lissy Verkade scarf is juuust right.

More outfit (and destination) ideas over here.

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Of a Kind

To call this Nomia number a T-shirt dress is a massive understatement. —erica

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Amira Marion’s 7 Step Guide to Having the BEST Time in Antigua, Guatemala

If you didn’t want to go before…

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Holy whoa.

Growing up in Ann Arbor, Michigan, Amira Mason, didn’t really understand the amazingness that was her childhood home. “My parents had spent a lot of time in Guatemala in the seventies, so my house had a lot of textiles and wall hangings from their travels,” she says. “I was blind to them at first.” When she got older, though, Amira began appreciating those vibrant surroundings—and decided to create a home décor company, Archive New York, to pay tribute. Today, Amira makes regular trips to Antigua, a Spanish colonial town in Guatemala, on her way to the lake where most of her fabrics are woven, and with her travels come tips—lots of ‘em—that this quasi-native is very down to share with us. —maura brannigan

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1) To Visit: Colegio de San Jerónimo
“These ruins were built in 1759—it was originally a school for friars. The building was destroyed by an earthquake just 14 years later. But today, it’s a peaceful garden with great views of Volcán de Agua, the volcano Agua.”
(Corner of Alameda de Santa Lucia and 1a Calle Poniente)

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2) To Eat, Pt. 1: Sabe Rico
“Sabe Rico is a little restaurant-slash-café with seating in this lush tropical garden backyard. The menu is extensive, and they have nice juices and smoothies.”
(6a. Avenida Sur 7)

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3) To Stay: Casa Santo Domingo
“This hotel is arguably the most beautiful place to stay in Antigua. The building was once a convent that was partially destroyed by that earthquake in 1773, and the hotel was built around its ruins. Even if you don’t stay here, it’s still well-worth a visit to wander the gardens and peak into one of the many museums.”
(3a. Calle Oriente 28)

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4) To Eat, Pt. 2: Hector’s Bistro
“Hector’s is a super, super cute little French spot with great food and a nice ambiance. It’s right across from the bright yellow La Merced, which is an impressive 16th century church—definitely worth a visit, too!”
(1ra. Calle Poniente 9A)

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5) To Shop: Nim Po’t
“Nim Po’t has such a great collection huipilstraditional blouses—from all over Guatemala, and the prices are good. They also sell postcards, coffee, chocolate—so it’s a great place to get some souvenirs to bring back home.”
(5a. Avenida Norte)

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6) To Eat, Pt. 3: Quesos y Vinos
“Quesos y Vinos is right in an old, gated house just near the city center. I definitely recommend sitting on the candle-lit patio and ordering some brick-oven pizza and wine.”
(5ta. Avenida Norte 32A)

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7) To Snack: Helados Exoticos
“This place is a tiny ice cream spot right off the central square. They serve up some crazy flavors like sweet potato pie, apple & chipotle, wasabi fig, and one of my favorites, mezcal.”
(4ta. Avenia 5A)

Amira has an edition coming tomorrow that will make you happy even if you’re not traveling further than your couch.

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Scope out Some Amazing Vintage Guatemalan Textiles with Amira Marion

They just don’t make ‘em like this anymore.

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The beauty of Archive New York’s pillows is in the fabrics and the patterns, sure, but it’s really the company’s name that says it all. Amira Marion, the label’s fearless leader, set out to create the brand to—yep, you guessed it—archive some of the rarest, most unique textiles in Guatemalan history, reproducing them in embroidery or digitally printing their motifs on silk. Here, Amira walks us through five of her all-time favorite finds—some of which have made their way onto her company’s catalog. —maura brannigan

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“These textiles are from Solola, Guatemala, on Lake Atitlan. This is one of my favorite villages for textiles in the entire country. They combine so many techniques into one huipil—a traditional blouse. Here you have jaspé, a technique of tie-dying threads before weaving, you have machine embroidery (the plant-like shapes), and then you have hand embroidery (the embroidery on the center bottom). I’m still trying to recreate these. The colors are amazing!”

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“This is a pair of men’s shorts from another village, Santa Catarina Polopo, just a few miles away from Solola. In the sixties and seventies, all the textiles in Santa Catarina were red, but one day the weavers decided they were ready for a change. So now all of the textiles are blue. I love how this fabric got faded by the sun.”

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“This sixties textile is from Santiago Atitlan, another village also on Lake Atitlan. I have seen so many textiles from this village, but they now have a machine doing the embroidery instead of this thick hand embroidery. I work with Maya Traditions, a non-profit on Lake Atitlan, to recreate this textile for my collection!”

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“I love these brocade textiles from the village of Tecpan. When the Spaniards came to colonize Guatemala, they brought over their brocade technique, which they integrated into Guatemalan weaving in an amazing way. I love the combination of traditional tribal motifs with the European brocade florals. That’s my Tecpan pillow in the bottom corner! I took a portion of the original textile, enlarged it, and brought the colors back to their original splendor.”

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“This blue fabric is from Tactic, which is a town outside of Antigua. I really love the simplicity of the polka dot motif—it’s the origin of my pillow for Of a Kind! I’m currently working with an artisan group in Tactic to recreate this textile with the traditional back-strap loom.”

Just wait until you see what Amira made for us! It’s coming tomorrow, and your inbox is gonna love it.

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Archive New York

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From the loving way Amira Marion approaches vintage textiles, you’d think the fabrics raised her or something. And, well, they kind of did: Thanks to her parents’ travel bug, her entire Michigan home was decked out in wall hangings from Guatemala—but that’s not something Amira really appreciated until she went off to college, studying clothing design at Parsons. “I got really into it when I was in school,” she explains. “I loved discovering textiles from other countries. When I wanted to start this textile project, Guatemala was naturally the first place to start.”

But she didn’t dive into a label of her own immediately following graduation. Instead, Amira worked in accessories at Madewell and then headed to Paris. There, she learned the language, met her bonafide-Frenchman husband, and decided it was time to do her own thing business-wise. “It was while I was in France that I started thinking about the project and making some contacts in Guatemala, before finally moving back here and launching,” says Amira of developing her so-good pillow line, Archive New York, and returning to its namesake city.

Since Archive’s February 2014 launch, Amira has been focused on really nailing her wondrous, two-prong approach to fabric-production. After sourcing vintage textiles in small Guatemalan villages, she either a) replicating them, snazzy embroidery and all, with some modern updates or 2) scans the patterns, manipulates them, and prints them on silk. “You just have to keep telling yourself that it’s okay to start small,” she explains. “Do what you can. Do everything you can.” —maura brannigan

archivenewyork.com

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Of a Kind

Might we suggest this Jesse Kamm dress for any fall weddings you’re hitting? (Because that matrimonial season is def not over?) —erica

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Of a Kind

If you aren’t keeping an eye on Lauren Manoogian's knits, you are definitely missing out. —erica

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Of a Kind

Champagne Diamond Three Bezel Ring by Jennie Kwon Designs for Of a Kind

BUY / 50 of a kind / $260

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