Double Take: House of Cards

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If your poker face is a bit lacking, let these bits of amazingness do the talking. An uncut sheet of playing cards from Misc. Goods Co. makes a pretty stellar piece of wall art, and how great are these king and queen hangers from Article? They’re a sure bet, as far as we’re concerned. —alex ronan

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Get Into Sarah Fox’s Totally Unpredictable Sculptures

Looking for something to do with an old Halloween costume? Here’s an idea…

Though Sarah Fox might be better known for Cursive Design, her line of delicate-but-unexpected jewelry, her first foray into the art world came via sculpture—and you can still find her creating these larger-scale pieces when she’s not making ones you can wear. “I’m always on the lookout for things that catch my eye,” she says. “The best part about sculpture is that it doesn’t have to play by the rules. It can go anywhere!” See what she means below. —genevieve ang

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How It All Started
“I probably made my first sculpture when I was 16. It was a horribly ugly thing—my dad brought me to the hardware store and taught me how to weld with a blowtorch. I used this copper tubing to make a stick figure in a running pose and stuck it on a piece of wood that I painted with clouds. I think I might have even put some wings on it. And then I went to art school and studied sculpture! I like to add a playful, whimsical nature to things—like this piece, with the poufs. The balance between soft and hard is definitely something I explore a lot.”

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Inspiration Searching
“I’m always on the hunt for materials and objects at hardware stores, gem and mineral shows, costume shops, and on the street. Materials really fascinate me, and I’m interested in finding the balance and play between them—from building structures that hug and cherish an object, like this foam piece with dolomite that I got at a gem show, to the simple play between color, shape, line, and texture.”

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Surprising Materials
“For this hanging piece in particular, I was in a Halloween shop recently, and I was just super drawn to the wig and the color. The cashier was like, ‘Are you going to a party?’ I didn’t buy it because I was going to wear it, but sometimes I lie about it because I don’t want to get into how I do art with found objects. It’s just too weird.”

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Sculpture Vs. Jewelry
“I’ve started focusing on more traditional jewelry techniques with Cursive, so sculpture is where I can really experiment! But it’s really a cycle with both my sculpture and jewelry practices—I never had an interest in using metal in sculpture before I started making in the main material in my jewelry line. They both feed off each other.”

Sarah made us a rockin’ lapis necklace—check it out here.

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Double Take: Clear the Table

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Food-obsessives rejoice. Get a load of this hyper-realistic painting by Lee Price titled, oh-so-appropriately, “Self-portrait in Tub with Chinese Food.” And, at right, spy the most out-there tablecloth ever, by the Italian duo Maurizio Cattelan and Pierpaolo Ferrari, covered in bread, meat, sweets…and bugs. —alex ronan

Chow down on a lot more “Double Take” here.

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Sara Gates Makes Some Print-Happy Art

She demonstrates that black-and-white can be way impactful.

“I’ve been making art ever since I can remember. I started out with painting and still think of everything I make as a painting,” says Sara Gates, the Pratt Institute-trained designer behind the fly, hand-dyed bag line Cook & Gates. And though many of her creations these days can be flung over your shoulder—we’re talking hard-working totes and duffles—she’s done some much larger-scale works, too. Here, she brings the big guns. —genevieve ang

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“I created this installation for Rebekah Templeton Contemporary Art in 2009, and it was really massive. It covered an entire room. I screen-printed everything, and you couldn’t really differentiate the books from the wall because everything was covered in the same pattern.”

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“This was another large-scale collaboration I did with three other artists for an installation at the Live With Animals Gallery in Williamsburg. We built everything from scratch (yes, the entire house!) and even had a backyard, which we seeded with grass. It was really cool to walk into the gallery and be faced with this house in the middle. It took me about three weeks to complete—working nonstop.”

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“When I started my screen-printing studio Kingsland Printing, I struggled to figure out how to make my own work around that. These paintings come from desperation, to some extent—I made them around the studio, sometimes by accident. The one on the right is paint and off-spray ink from where we wash out screens. The one on the left was actually just water and dye that I put on canvas on the roof. It’s really interesting for me to see the patterns that emerge from accidents of intention.”

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“This graphic, black-and-white painting is a screen-print of a piece that I hand-dyed. My favorite part about dyeing is how you can do the same thing over and over but get different results every time, and what I love about screen-printing is how you can get identical patterns every time. It’s really interesting to combine them in this way—I’m playing off the limitations and nuances of these opposite practices.”

Sara made us a copper tote with leather straps that’s preeetty perfect.

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Double Take: Apple Picking

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You don’t have to be Gwyneth’s offspring to get into these goods. Put up Enzo Mari’s gigantic print in the kitchen to guarantee your daily dose, or take things a little further with Naoto Fukasawa, who has created what is undeniably the most beautiful humidifier on the planet. Lady Goop would be proud. alex ronan

Like whatcha see? Get more here.

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Double Take: Seaweed Snacks

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Is it too early to start thinking about summer? Don’t answer that. Thankfully, this ocean-inspired goodness can hang in your home even when you’re wearing your wooliest socks. Now it’s just about deciding between Wayne Pate on your walls and Bernardaud at your table. —alex ronan

More “Double Take”—if you can handle it.

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Weather Vain: Brentwood, California

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Claire and I spent last week housed in Brentwood—and I’d be lying if I said it was easy to leave. An ideal outfit if we’d stayed four more days… —erica

+ Skinny straps that are right for the L.A. climate in a color that feels like October, from Steven Alan.

+ A Eugenia Kim hat to cover-up post-SoulCycle hair.

+ Getty Center views, meet this Orly Genger by Jaclyn Mayer cuff.

+ A white denim Rag & Bone jacket—as creamy as the scoops at Sweet Rose Creamery

+ The sort of earrings—from Dream Collective—that all the girls at Jenni Kayne would go nuts over.

+ These No.6 clogs = minimalist perfection. Kinda like the incomparable sushi at Sugarfish.

A “Weather Vain” front is moving in…

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Meet Christy Curcuru’s Favorite Collaborator, her Husband

Welcome to Adorable City, population 2.

Christy Curcuru—behind the bead-centric line Growing Jewelry—met her husband Philip while they were both studying at RISD, and the too-cute pair has been collaborating ever since. In their at-home studio in Austin, the two paint, create, and design together while both working on their own projects—for Philip, that means music and graphic design—and somehow never seem to get tired of each other. Get the DL on one of their ongoing projects below. —koun bae

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“My husband had been making these little origami painted sculptures, and he set up a still life and painted a background and started this whole little world that we ended up calling Chirpyworld.”

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“They’re little Chirpies—like little figurines. They look like totem poles, and they all fit in the palm of your hand. So he started it, and then I started helping him paint the first painting. That was years ago.”

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“We work really well together in a lot of different ways—but especially with painting. He’s really accurate and fast at doing an underpainting and laying it all out, but he’s also colorblind. That makes it really interesting for me—because I’ll come in and look at what he’s painted, and it’s all funky, which gives it a unique feeling. So I’ll sometimes leave what he’s done—like when he mixes up red and green, I kind of like it.”

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“Our friends own a gallery space here, and they asked us to do a show. We had like a month. So we just painted like crazy people for that month, and we would just swap paintings and go back and forth. That was the process.”

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“We really just wanted to create this little world, and we actually didn’t end up displaying the objects—just the paintings—because we thought it might take away from what people might get out of the paintings. The paintings really have a childish, youthful quality, and a lot of them were sold to a children’s hospital.”

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“All the paintings are gone, but we have all the little Chirpies left—I don’t want to give them up!”

Photos courtesy of Nicole Mlakar and Brett Buchanan.

Get a look at Christy’s first inspired edition right now!

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Weather Vain: Richmond, Virginia - 72 and Clear

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Richmond seems like the ideal destination for a long weekend, doesn’t it? And, man, fall-y days like today really make the Capital of the South somewhere I wanna be. —erica

Clockwise from top left:

+ The sort of Saturday boots you’ll buy now and wear five days a week until March.

+ NOT your basic gray tee, c/o OAK—kind like how Boka is hardly your run-of-the-mill taco truck.

+ These Costalots + a sunny stroll through Forest Hill Park = perfection?

+ Sarah Loertscher earrings that’ll earn you mad respect as you mill around Art Works.

+ Embrace the jacket-with-bare-legs thing while you can with the help of this Equipment bomber.

+ An Chiyome bag that expands—a feature that’ll come in handy if you pick up a few paperbacks at Fountain Bookstore.

+ A 3.1 Phillip Lim skirt that will hide any spills from a Frito pie incident at Pasture.

Here’s your chance to get other weather-approp outfit idears.

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Dane Glorious: 9 Places Erica Thinks You’ve Gotta Go in Copenhagen

You guys! I just got back from Copenhagen. Like, on Sunday. My fiancé and I chilled there for a week (before he started a three-week-long econometrics course—yah, whoa—at the university there). The city’s as nice and liveable and design-y and delicious as you’ve heard it is. And while it’s all so FRESH IN MY MIND, I wanted to share the spots I think you should most definitely hit—besides Rundetårn, Tivoli, Christiania, and the other guide-book classics—if you’re in the market for a Scandinavian adventure. erica

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Meyers: Quickly became our who-cares-about-health-on-vacation breakfast spot.

Meyers Bageri
Word is, the hindbærsnitter—described by Bon Appetit as the best raspberry Pop-Tart ever—is where it’s at, but our vote goes to the thing that looks like cinnamon focaccia, which puts Cinnabon to shame. The bakery’s on this cute cobblestoned street Jægersborggade in the city’s Nørrebro neighborhood, where we stayed. And it’s like a two-minute walk to Assistens Kirkegard—the cemetery where Hans Christian Andersen and Søren Kierkegaard are buried that’s a prime spot for picnicking.
(Jægersborggade 9)

Ruby
Cocktails! Delicious ones! We went early and sat at the bar and watched the boats on the canal. The Summer and Ale was awesome (gin + cynar + elderflower + lemon + IPA), and there was a drink involving fresh passion fruit that—shhh—was not on the menu.
(Nybrogade 10)

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Yes, I’m ready to move into the Hay shop.

Hay
DANG. If Japan’s Muji and France’s Merci had a little Before Sunrise-style encounter in Denmark, you’d get Hay. This 10-year-old design company has a couple of outposts around town, but go to the sun-drenched, two-story one called Hay House, and let me know how many tea towels, office supplies, and little glasses you take home—and how many pieces of furniture you mourn having to leave behind.
(Østergade 61)

Relæ
No, we didn’t go to Noma—so stop asking. We did, however, throw down for Relæ, which is from one of the vaunted restaurant’s alums (who also cooked at El Bulli, NBD). One bite into a dish of mind-blowingly delicious cooked sunflower seeds, and we knew we’d made the right decision.
(Jaegersborggade 41)

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Mikkeller has some good labels, huh?

Mikkeller & Friends
This does not feel like a beer bar at all—and that’s a total compliment. It’s open and airy, all pale wood and seafoam. Oh, yah, and there are 40 beers on tap from the super-buzzy brewery and its, you know, friends. While you’re there, you have to go to the attached shop to see all the pretty bottles.
(Stefansgade 35)

Amager Strandpark
You know what I learned? That Danes really love a suntan, and that they all hop on their bikes and head to this city beach when they have some free time. When we went, there was a farm stand selling watermelon wedges that really hit the spot.

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Just a diving board reaching out toward the water that the Lousiana.

Louisiana Museum of Modern Art
The artwork here’s top-notch (Yves Klein, Henry Moore, Picasso), but it’s the setting that makes is absolutely worth the 45-minute trip outside the city. It’s right on the ocean with these ridiculously manicured lawns—a definition-of-picturesque sort of thing. Bring a lunch and sit on the grass or get in line for the classy-looking buffet, which was mobbed by noon.
(Gl Strandvej 13, 3050 Humlebæk)

Kødbyens Fiskebar
Don’t let the big cow presiding over the place confuse you: This is a fish spot. It’s in the meatpacking district—where there are actually still butcher shops, not just bars—and that setting gives it a more chilled-out vibe than it might otherwise have. There are canvas lawn chairs for drinking in the parking lot, and the mussels are really, really killer.
(Marnixplaats 12)

Klassik Moderne Møbelkunst
Just before we headed to this spot, we hit the Designmuseum Danmark, and, IMHO, this shop was way more enlightening on the Danish modernism front. There are tons of impeccable pieces from Hans J. Wegner and Poul Henningsen (superstars in that world), and the catalog the store puts out provides an impressive amount of history and context.
(Bredgade 3)

Tips & Tricks

+ Rent a bike. It’s shocking how much easier (slash safer) cycling is in this city than in NYC. Even the locks are simpler. My ride ran about $15/day.

+ Everyplace takes debit cards, but credit cards—that’s another story. It’s technically possible, but it requires a whole conversation each time you go to pay with plastic sans PIN.

+ We didn’t encounter a single person who didn’t speak English, and thank god: How to pronounce anything besides “thank you” in Danish remains a mystery to me.

+ Copenhagen = not cheap. At all. Save yo’ pennies.

Have other travel plans in the works? Check out these city guides…

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