7 Austin Must-Hits From Orly Genger and Jaclyn Mayer

Art museums and cowboy boots (y’all).

image

Gotta love a work trip that doubles as a vacation. When Jaclyn Mayer and Orly Genger got the chance to head to Austin—both to do a trunk show for their slick jewelry line and an event for one of Orly’s sicker-than-sick art installations—they made a whole thing of it. They booked a three-day trip, shacked up at the architect Charles Moore’s former house—that’s Jaclyn standing in front of its sick pool above­—and hit the town. Here’s what they think every visitor ought to tackle. —alisha prakash

image

Orly: “On Thursday night, I gave a talk about my installation in front of my piece at Laguna Gloria. My piece is called Current and is made out of reclaimed lobster rope that I hand-knotted and painted, then constructed on-site. Laguna Gloria is a beautiful and peaceful location—which I did not want to compete with, but rather embrace. I designed the piece to echo the structural elements of the amphitheater that is already there and built out a barge so that the piece could connect the land to water.”
(3809 W. 35th St.)

image

Jaclyn: “We did a little shopping tour of Austin. One of our favorite shops was JM Dry Goods. They specialize in crafts such as weavings, ceramics, jewelry, and clothing. I purchased a lovely Mexican kaftan, perfect for the beach”
(215 S. Lamar, Ste. C)

image

Jaclyn: “One afternoon we went to Barton Springs, a staple in Austin. It’s a natural swimming hole where you can get relief from the heat. All you need is five minutes in the cold water, and you’re ready to get back to all the fun Austin has to offer.”
(2201 Barton Springs Rd.)

image

Jaclyn: “One of my favorite things to do is to find flea markets. Uncommon Objects is a fun indoor one with loads of bits and bobs. Unfortunately, we didn’t purchase anything this trip—luggage space was tight!”
(1512 S. Congress Ave.)

image

Jaclyn: “And of course you can’t leave Austin without shopping for some cowboy boots! Next to Uncommon Objects was this crazy boot shop, Allens Boots. It was fun to look at all the insane patterns and leather!”
(1522 S. Congress Ave.)

image

Jaclyn: “On Saturday night, we went to Sway, this beautiful Thai restaurant with an open kitchen. We got to sit at the bar and watch them cook all the meals.”
(1417 S. 1st St.)

image

Jaclyn: “One of the reasons for our trip was a trunk show at the shop Valentine’s Too.  Trunk shows are always fun as they are some of the few times we get to personally pick out jewelry for people. It is always a great experience to watch someone fall in love with a piece.”(3801 N. Capital of Texas Hwy)

Photo of art installation courtesy of Brian Fitzsimmons of The Contemporary Austin.

You’ve gotta see the ring these two made—it’s a total hit in our book.

 

comments, reblogs & likes

Notes

12 notes

The Fixers: Where to Get Your Stuff Repaired in Austin, Chicago, Portland, and San Francisco

image

How do you find a cobbler who really gets leather or a tailor who can replace the zipper on a favorite dress like it ain’t no thang? Inquire with the designers in town. Well, we went ahead and did the asking for you—so bookmark this business. —erica

TAILORS

Austin – Ace Custom Tailors / 700 S. Lamar Blvd.
“They’re old school and precise—and I can peek in Kick Pleat next door to see what’s new.” —Katie Kime

Chicago – The Alterationist / 804 N. Bishop St.
“The owner Mary is incredibly talented and sweet. She specializes in bridal alterations, but she makes anything fit perfectly.” —Laura Lombardi

Chicago – De Louice / 1755 W. North Ave. #102
“My husband has had great service from De Louice in Wicker Park for custom shirts. He had a simple classic white button down made to his measurements that will last and last.” —Sarah Fox of Cursive Design

Portland - John Blasioli / john@johnblasioli.com
“One of my favorite friends and designers in town, John is unmatched in his eye for tailoring and construction.” —Caesy Oney of Draught Dry Goods

San Francisco – Lora Dukler Couture / 3112 California St.
“In addition to doing exquisite custom work, Lora is one of the best in Northern California for altering wedding gowns and elaborate dresses of any kind. She’s expensive but more than worth it.” —Ryan DeBonville

SHOE REPAIRS

Austin – Austin Shoe Hospital / multiple locations
“They are surgeons for shoes. Those designer shoes that are so old they’re becoming vintage but you have to hold on to? They make it possible.” —Katie Kime

Austin – Golden Slipper Modern Boot Repair / 1903 S. 1st St.
“I trust my vintage cowboy boots to Golden Slipper. They can repair handbags and luggage, too.” —Natalie Davis of Canoe

Chicago – Beehive Shoe Works / 35 N. Wells St.
“Winter in Chicago is very, very rough on shoes. Beehive has been able to take even my most beat-up pairs and make them look brand-new. Quick turnaround time is a major plus.” —Laura Lombardi

Oakland – Rockridge Keys Cut & Shoes Repair / 5100 Broadway
“I took my cork Dieppa Restrepos here. He took the time to carefully stain the new soles to perfectly match my shoes and added a complimentary repair to the toe of the shoes. There is also an amazing selection of neon custom keys to choose from.” Kindah Khalidy

Portland – Hollywood Shoe Repair / 4504 NE Sandy Blvd.
“They’re great problem-solvers.” —Caesy Oney of Draught Dry Goods

San Francisco – Anthony Shoe Services / 340 Kearny St.
“These guys will bring back your favorite Prada shoes from the dead, and they repair handbags, too!” —Ryan DeBonville

DRY CLEANERS

Portland – Plaza Cleaners / 803 NW 21st Ave.; 909 NW Everett
“Green dry-cleaning—I actually worked there part-time in college!” —Caesy Oney of Draught Dry Goods

JEWELRY REPAIRS

Austin – Bead It / 2058 S. Lamar Blvd.
“For all of my costume-jewelry repair, I use Bead It. I take all of my mega-pieces here.” —Katie Kime

Portland - Simon Golub & Sons / 2820 SE 8th Ave. #2
“This is one of my favorite places in town, and I work with them often—super-sweet people who do great work.” —Caesy Oney of Draught Dry Goods

San Francisco – Balzan Jewelry Repair / 210 Post St. #306
“They do phenomenal work with costume and fine jewelry. It’s not inexpensive, but it’s completely worth it.” —Ryan DeBonville 

Click here for recs in L.A.! And here for ones in NYC!

comments, reblogs & likes

Notes

15 notes

Oldies but Goodies: How to Vintage Shop Like You Actually Know What You’re Doing

image

When we visited Austin—vintage-store capital of the universe, maybe?—we really wanted to score a perfect pair of nineties overalls or a Sally Draper-worthy dress. But here’s the thing: We suck at combing racks of eighties knits and fifty-year-old maxi dresses. Thankfully, we had our girl Elizabeth Kott to help us sort it out—she runs the top-notch consignment site Closet Rich and seriously knows a find when she sees one. Get her tips here and rest assured that we left Texas with a few new-to-us pieces that made packing that carry-on even trickier. —erica

ELIZABETH KOTT’S PROTIPS:

1) Know what vibe you’re going for—and reject all else.
“My target look: fancy grandma-meets-Jordan Catalano. When you do ripped denim, I think it’s really important that it be balanced with something tailored and chic—you don’t want to go full Catalano.”

2) Have a tailor (or three) in your arsenal.
“My vintage collection started off with items that were my grandma’s and my mom’s that I just updated through tailoring, and I think that is a really key thing—to have a tailor who can execute what it is that you want. I have three different types of tailors: one tailor for hemming of jeans, one who can restructure a cheap dress, and somebody I can trust with amazing heirloom pieces. Usually, with dresses, it’s about streamlining them—making them a little more formfitting—and taking up the hem. And, in most cases, you can take the shoulder pads out of something as long as you get it tailored afterward.”

3) Avoid the crowds.
“I’ve been going to the Long Beach Antique Market, which is actually more furniture-based—which means that there aren’t as many people there shopping for clothes.”

4) Hone in on the categories that work for you.
“Dresses and coats are big for me. I’ve never bought bathing suits. Vintage pants are hard for me—because of the fit—but vintage denim is definitely a worthy time investment. And I don’t shop vintage shoes, but I’m not opposed to, like, a vintage Ferragamo flat.”

5) Pay attention to the little things.
“I look for special details like embroidery or pleating—or fabrics, like silk, that hold up.”

6) When it comes to eBay and Etsy, you better know what you’re trying to find.
“I have done some eBay and Etsy searches. For instance, if there’s a certain type of coat I want, I can go there to search for really specific things, like a dope raincoat.”

7) Think about outfitting your home, too.
“I love vintage scarves. I make pillows out of them—I have a collection, and that’s a great way to display it. I also like the idea of just hanging them.”

8) Know how to get a cheap fix.
“I think one of the best finds at vintage stores is a fun, patterned dress that you can pay under $30 for and do a $20, max, alteration. Then you have an amazing dress for $50 or so. I think that’s the type of thing that spices up your wardrobe that isn’t a huge investment but that you can feel super-confident in.”

Want to know more about Elizabeth and Closet Rich? We’ve got the scoop.

comments, reblogs & likes

Notes

20 notes

Of a Kind

HEY, TEXANS (or those of you headed to SXSW!). What are you doin’ Saturday? Come see us! And shop some Of a Kind and Madewell under one roof. With drinks and treats, even. And probably hugs—because who are we kidding? —erica

comments, reblogs & likes

Notes

7 notes

City Haul: Where We Eat and Shop in Austin *and* L.A.

This week, Claire and I are headed west. Our itinerary: Austin, L.A., and Vegas. And though we can’t really comment on the latter—you know, what happens in Vegas…—we did want to share the places we’ll be visiting in destinations #1 and #2. In fact! We told Conde Nast Traveler alllll about our go-tos, and so for the full run-down, you best click on through. —erica

image

AUSTIN! From tacos at La Condesa (pictured!) to warm-weather-appropriate sweaters from Kick Pleat to oysters as often as we can get them—more here.

image

LOS ANGELES! We’re westside girls, and the are the Venice/West Hollywood/Santa Monica/Brentwood—like Tenoversix, shown up there!—that we’re hitting, for surez. This way for the scoop.

For more city-guide madness, click!

comments, reblogs & likes

Notes

11 notes

Popping Up: Come See Us at the Madewell in Austin this Saturday!

image

This is what Claire and I look like most days: a whole lot of denim and a bunch o’ Of a Kind accessories.

Much of our jeanery comes via Madewell—Claire basically hoards their chambray shirts, and I’ve developed a serious relationship with the high-rise skinny jeans. So to celebrate our affections, we’re going to be hanging out at Madewell at the Domaine in Austin, Texas, this Saturday, March 8, from 3pm to 5pm. There will be shopping (duh!), music c/o DJ Mahealani, snacks, a photo booth, and micheladas. It’s going to be sick. So, if you’re in the area, COME!

In case you’re wondering what we’re wearing…
Claire: Madewell Indigo Linen Ex-Boyfriend ShirtMadewell Skinny Skinny Jeans in Pure WhiteKate Necklace by Lizzie Fortunato Jewels for Of a Kind.
Erica: Madewell Denim TeeMadewell High Riser Skinny Skinny JeansLibra Cuff by Lizzie Fortunato Jewels for Of a KindDeco Eclipse Necklace by Lulu Frost for Of a Kind.

comments, reblogs & likes

Notes

4 notes

Step Inside Alyson Fox’s Glorious Home-Slash-Studio

Ready to have your mind blown? Oh, good.

“Our interior space is very minimal—a lot of breathing room for thinking,” says Alyson Fox, the jewelry designer and maker extraordinaire who moved into a home she and her husband built in Spicewood, Texas—35-ish miles from downtown Austin!—in November 2012. “It has a lot of nice, quiet details and compliments the landscape we see from every spot in the house. I love opening the door and running around outside with our puppy…and I love showering outside.” Get lost in the unreal space below. —alisha prakash

image

“I spend a good portion of my day out in the main living area. I sketch on the kitchen table a lot and have a weekly ritual of rearranging the ceramic pieces on the shelves. That helps me center my thoughts for some reason. I also like visiting the fridge a lot—snacking is apart of my creative process big-time.”

image

“We wanted pops of neon in our house alongside all the neutral and wood. These dueling pink bowls live on our counter in the kitchen. The lucite pink bowl was the first piece we bought from a online store in Australia. Its inspiration is a candy wrapper. I wish I could remember the designer’s name. It glows during the day from all the light. The other one is a Kaleido tray designed by Clara von Zweigbergk that I got at Nannie Inez. They come in really great colors.”

image

“I have been making a set of recycled leather flags for Hawkins New York and have some other flag-inspired pieces coming out with my own line as well. I have always loved flags.”

image

“I keep most packing materials that I get. I use cardboard for making lots of different things. I love the way boxes look when they are taken apart—the shapes are very inspiring to me. On the ground are swatches of rug prototypes that are in the works (a.k.a. comfy dog beds to our pup Stache).”

image

“We bought the land about two and a half years ago. My husband and I morphed a couple of houses that we liked for the initial design, and then it was a collective project with his family to get the design details fine-tuned and built. His dad did the plans and plumbing, and his brother did the engineering, contracting, and final woodworking. The view is what sold us on moving to Hill Country.”

image

“These are some of the pieces that I did with & Other Stories. The canvas pieces are prototypes for tapestries that I made from dyed drop cloths that we used when building our house.”

image

“This is my studio. It’s really exciting for me to have a studio in our home. It stays pretty clean, but looks different each month depending on what I am working on. I don’t work well with a lot of clutter, so I clean it up every week. I don’t get very attached to things, so they get recycled or given to friends when I have gotten what I need to out of them.”

image

“These three things are taped next to my computer on my desk because they make me happy—some mini flowers my husband picked outside for me before he left for work one day, a portrait from my Shade of Red series, and a photo my dad took of me and my sis cruising on our bikes in San Antonio when we were itty-bitties.”

image

“This is a shot of the house from down below.”

image

“Stache—my bestie, my studio mate. If he’s not on one of the rug samples, he’s under my desk at my feet. He is so much of my day. At least 15 times a day I stop and smother him.”

Alyson’s new edition on Sunday is just as rad as her home—see it first in our newsletter.

comments, reblogs & likes

Notes

10 notes

Katie Kime’s Grand Tour of the Coolest Spots in Austin

The North Carolina native takes over the Live Music Capital of the World. That is, Austin, Texas.

The sweet-as-pie furniture and accessories designer Katie Kime lists “doing Austin” as one of her main interests. Here she gives us a run-down of the city’s six best spots. —olivia seely

image

“The Austin City Limits music festival has always done tapings of artists and bands in Austin at a place called ACL Live. Recently, when the W Hotel was built in downtown Austin, they built an extension, which is the ACL Live Moody Theater. So literally, where I’m sitting in this photo next to the Willie Nelson statue is where they hold unbelievable tapings and performances.”

image

Clark’s is an oyster bar. Down to the smallest details, they’ve done the most amazing job of giving it this Southern, prepster flair. Everything from the busboys in rugby shirts to the waiters in boat shoes with handkerchiefs coming out of their back pockets is an ode to where I grew up in North Carolina.”

image

Hijo is there newest venture from the people behind a really cool store in Austin is called JM Dry Goods. It’s built in a greenhouse, and the owners are a married couple with amazing taste. The guy makes hand-made leather bags stamped with anchors—an icon I love so much I have one tattooed on my wrist—that are to die for. They curate amazing collections, and I’m always inspired in any of their spaces.”

image

“So basically every cool thing in Austin has hotelier Liz Lambert’s signature on it. Jo’s is where I go to do work about three days a week just to get out of my office.”

image

Hotel San Jose is my go-to place for drinks and my first recommendation for where to stay if you’re an out-of-towner. This is also one of Liz Lambert’s many gifts to Austin. There’s nothing she does that I’m not crazy about. She’s a bit of a legend in my mind, and I have more than a bit of a crush on her.”

image

“I love Moscow Mules, and the best one in Austin is at Contigo. It’s also the best outdoor-eating space you can find!”

Photographs by Kelsey Shaw.

Get Katie’s made-in-Austin edition tomorrow! YAY!

comments, reblogs & likes

Notes

11 notes

How Leeann Molinari and Alyson Fox Work Together—Long-Distance

These lockets have their roots in Portland and Austin. 

Leeann Molinari and Alyson Fox have been designing and making intricately patterned lockets together for more than two years now—despite the fact that Leeann lives in Portland, Oregon, and Alyson in Austin, Texas. So, how do the long-distance collaborators get stuff done? “We e-mail a lot,” says Alyson. Here’s a look at their 2,000-miles-apart process. —raquel laneri

Alyson:“I start by drawing with markers, and then I’ll use watercolors. Whatever I’m liking, I’ll scan on the computer and start to play with, repeating patterns, to see if it works for me. Leeann kind of gets the best of what I’m working on—like if I’m working on a wallpaper pattern or maybe thinking about something for a scarf, she’ll get some of that. If I’m working on a drawing, she’ll get some of that. [Ed: More on some of Alyson’s other work here.]

Alyson: “I then e-mail Leeann a variety of designs to choose from: something that’s a little pared-down, almost symbol-like, and then an all-over pattern. It’s great because she never says, ‘I want a pattern that has yellow in it.’ She just says, ‘Let’s get some new stuff.’”

Leeann: “It’s absolutely a gut feeling—I usually go by what I love. Now I’ve kind of honed in on what people really respond to: a lot of colors, a lot of shapes and patterns, and a geometric theme. But it’s all kind of a gut thing.”

Leeann: “I then do the image-transfer onto the lockets. It’s a multi-step process, really intricate, and I use colored resins that can be really tricky and temperamental. It was a lot of trial and error. I get people e-mailing me, trying to get me to explain the process.  I’m pretty protective of that part of it—it’s top-secret!”

Leeann: “This is going to make it sound like it’s really easy, but it takes me probably 10 minutes to finish a locket. I mean, I’ve made so many of these—I’m so fast by now.”

Their limited-edition lockets will be here first thing in the morning. Sign up for our email list to get yours.

comments, reblogs & likes

Notes

3 notes

Verabel + Fox

Verabel + Fox designers Leeann Molinari (left) and Alyson Fox have been collaborating since 2007. But they’ve only hung out in-person once. Like, ever. It all started when Leeann, an art-school dropout who had just opened her own clothing store in Portland, Oregon, emailed Alyson and asked the Austin, Texas-based illustrator and graphic and textile designer if she would draw a logo for her new shop. “Leeann was just so sweet and so gracious and so understanding of the process,” says Alyson. “And ever since, we talked about what other collaborations we could do.” 

A few years later, the ideal second undertaking came along: Leann stumbled upon a trove of thousands of old lockets online, and she scooped up the whole lot, embellishing them with patterns and illustrations—and selling them like hotcakes from an Etsy shop that became so popular she closed her brick-and-mortar storefront. After about a year, she brought Alyson into the necklace mix, forging an easy partnership where Alyson designs the patterns and Leeann crafts the jewelry—you know, whenever they feel like it. “It’s totally like, ‘Hey, I’m kind of tired of looking at the ones that are up there, let’s do new ones,’” says Alyson. As far as other collaborations go, the duo is looking to move into T-shirts next. “But I’m hoping that people love the lockets for a long time to come,” says Leeann. “Because I have a lot of them.” —raquel laneri

etsy.com/shop/verabel

comments, reblogs & likes

Notes

3 notes