Weather Vain: San Diego, California - 81 and Clear

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TALK ABOUT A LOVELY DAY. If you’re in San Diego right now, well, congrats to you. Here’s how to celebrate in America’s Finest City. —erica

+ One Suno shirt, two personalities! (Which, by the way is totally an excuse to double down on the frozen goodness at Viva Pops.)

+ Perfect day for a pair of sunglasses (from Garrett Leight), no?

+ A skirt, by Raquel Allegra, that’ll hide the evidence of any Underbelly ramen accidents.

+ Awesome Jill Golden earrings—the crystals match the pale ales from Hess Brewing.

+ Rachel Comey shoes that could be slipped off very easily for some feet-in-the-sand time at Mission Beach.

+ A signet-style ring from Kule—as straight-up classic as the Hotel del Coronado.

+ A Clare Vivier wallet as BRIGHT and FUN as Belmont Park.

Looking for a “Weather Vain” near you? Click on.

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Step Inside Asia Ragland’s Baller Venice Beach Bungalow

The perfect excuse to buy a white couch.

Asia Ragland, the designer behind tough-girl jewelry line Feliks + Adrik, takes WFH to the next level. At her Venice Beach pad—just a stone’s throw from the beach—the washer-and-dryer nook doubles as shipping facility, and a dining table serves as a sketching-slash-assembly station by day. “What I treasure the most is being able to ride my bike to the end of Rose Avenue and jump in the ocean at the end of a workday…or during lunch,” she says. Yup, we’re jealous—and we haven’t even toured the space yet. —alisha prakash

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“This multi-functional table is where I sketch, assemble, and dine. I am a fan of texture and comfort, hence the many throws and rugs I decorate my furniture with. These two sheepskin rugs are from Ikea. I threw them onto this wooden chair to add an element of softness and create some cushy for my tushy.”

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“My jewelry collection has grown over the years. I generally gravitate towards unusual statement pieces, which is evident in my own designs.”

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“I love waking up in this room even though it doesn’t give me a chance to ever sleep in. The guitar was a birthday gift from my musical genius of a boyfriend. He taught me ‘Bird on the Wire’ by Leonard Cohen, but that’s the extent of my guitar playing. It gets more action when musically inclined friends visit. And the ornate jacket hanging on the wall was a gift from my father when he was in India.”

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“When I was on the hunt for a new home/work space in Venice, it was imperative that it be place I could spend all day and night in. Natural light and the ocean breeze flood my windows, living-room skylight, and open doors.”

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“This is our shared courtyard. There are eight bungalows on the property that were built in the early 1900s. We have had barbecues, crawfish boils, and dinners and have celebrated many birthdays parties here.”

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“The moment I signed the lease in Venice Beach, I knew I had to buy a white couch. Granted, it is covered with throws—but it still feels beach-y.”

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“This is the kitchen, where I display my small, yet beloved collection of cameras. The Nikon F50 is a 35mm film SLR camera that I lugged around Europe for four months in 2002. It was my first real camera. In the middle is a vintage DeJur 8mm movie camera I bought years ago at an antique shop in Big Sur. And the last one is a functional vintage Polaroid Land Camera that I bought in Mexico.”

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“I purchased this handmade wall tapestry, the vintage leather shoes, and the ornate umbrella on a recent trip to India with my mother. We returned with new luggage filled with all sorts of Indian treasures.”

Get your hands on Asia’s rad new edition before it’s too late!

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6 Spots Hillary Taymour Says You’ve Gotta Hit in Joshua Tree

Girlfriend goes there at least twice annually. So she knows what she’s talking about.

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Hillary, hiding behind a friendly cactus.

“Joshua Tree is such an amazing place. The energy there is something I have never felt anywhere else,” says Hillary Taymour, the mastermind behind the rad bag-and-apparel line Collina Strada who makes her way from Brooklyn to J-Tree for the holidays and post-Coachella every year. So where are the best places to get your hike on, catch some stellar views, soak up live music, and score vintage? Hillary gives us the lowdown. —alisha prakash

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The best room around, in Hillary’s opinion—that floor!

“I stay at this room that you can rent through the Joshua Tree Inn called the Fox. It’s on this amazing artist compound. I’ve been staying there for years. The Fox is off a dirt road, so a lot of people have dune buggies. You’ll wake up and there’ll be coyotes in your backyard—it’s really magical.”

Hospice Thrift Shop has some truly amazing finds. I got these really amazing, old photo books from the seventies there.”
(61675 29 Palms Hwy, Ste. B, Joshua Tree)

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How amazing-looking is The Integratron? Like, whoa.

The Integratron is this amazing place—with a wild story—that’s built entirely of wood. It’s a big dome where they do incredible sound baths, which are this amazing experience where they play crystal quartz bowls to heal each individual chakra. It’s a cleanse for your whole body and mind.”
(2477 Belfield Blvd., Landers)

Natural Sisters Café has great juices and smoothies. It’s one of the better places to get all-organic juice. Joshua Tree is a hippie town, but you can still find Applebee’s and Taco Bell—this is a better place to go.”
(61695 Twentynine Palms Hwy, Joshua Tree)

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If this isn’t inspiration to plan a trip…

Split Rock is one of my favorite hikes. It’s a big loop and really beautiful. You can see for miles.”

Pappy & Harriet’s usually has a good live gig going on. It’s a real fun local place to go for dinner and drinks. Monday is open mic night. There are these locals who are total rockers and singer/songwriters. They just jam for hours, playing great cover songs and original music—it’s pretty epic. Pappy & Harriet’s is also in Pioneertown, which is a little fake ghost town. It’s a tourist attraction—there’s always something going on there.”
(53688 Pioneertown Rd., Pioneertown)

Now’s your chance to scoop up Hillary’s Joshua Tree-ready tote! SO GOOD.

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Jaqet

The origin of the word entrepreneur is especially fitting for the French-born accessories designer Jacques Flynn, who started making his own wallets when he couldn’t scout out a minimalist style that suited him. Turns out, he was hardly alone: Soon after he started, a few of his friends requested his no-nonsense creations…and then a few strangers. In June 2012, his brand Jaqet was officially born.

Jacques constructs all of his products using a saddle stitch, “an extremely old stitch style that can only be done properly by hand,” he explains. And then there are the colors of the Jaqet leathers, which have a certain grainy richness thanks to the water-based dyes—and a secret technique—he uses.

When he’s not thinking about sleekifying your leather goods, he’s contemplating ways to streamline your car, moonlighting as an exterior designer at Mazda in Long Beach, California. But what do cars and wallets have in common? “I’d say a car is a man’s ultimate accessory,” he says of a ride’s ability to speak volumes about the guy who drives it (especially in L.A.!). That, and the possibility for excellence in design and craftsmanship—something he brings to both of his pursuits. —carly pifer

jaqet.com

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Joshu+Vela

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The best ideas come when you aren’t looking for them. At least, that was the case for Joshu+Vela founder Noah Guy, who first dreamt of starting his own bag and accessories company during a beach hang in Seminyak, Bali, a few years back. Feeling inspired, he came up with a few early designs and made use of Indonesia’s organic indigo dye, which his company still incorporates today. But don’t let Joshu+Vela’s exotic origins fool you: Noah is a fan of things American-made, through and through.

“I grew up appreciating quality,” says the designer, who describes visiting Orvis and L.L.Bean frequently as a kid with his dad—and being dismayed when so much American production got shipped overseas in the nineties. His determination to bring back the high-quality nature of war-era bags from the forties and fifties led Noah to decide to handcraft everything from a 900-square-foot studio in San Francisco’s SoMa neighborhood—taking the skills he’d honed at Levi’s, Old Navy, and Northface and throwing himself into Joshu+Vela full-force in 2010.

Now, Joshu+Vela produces a whole range of goodness—bags of all sizes, dopp kits, wallets—but the original design ethos remains intact. “There’s a certain pride in having a nice cloth,” Noah says. “That’s basically where we started with Joshu+Vela, and that’s what we’re trying to hold true to.” —carrie neill

joshuvela.com

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Steven Shein

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Long before Steven Shein, who describes himself as the “least fashion-oriented person in the fashion business,” got into jewelry and furniture design, he was a Lego-playing, tree-climbing eight-year old in South Africa. Hold down the fast-forward button for a bit and you’ll whiz past Steven moving to CA with his family, enrolling at University of California in Santa Barbara for philosophy at 18, discovering contemporary art, and switching his major to sculpture. Press pause.

"It was all an accident," Steven explains of his road to jewelry design. "I was working on an art project that dealt with the body’s engagement with the environment when an instructor suggested I make something wearable. So I made a big, blocky bangle. That was the starting point."

At 22, Steven moved to Los Angeles and headed to the Art Center to pursue environmental design, where he stumbled across laser-cutting technology and started getting busy with plexiglass. And while alternative materials drew him in, since launching his namesake line in late 2012, Steven has embraced using go-to metals—bronze, silver, and gold—in less-than-classical ways. “Lately, I’ve been playing with sandblasting and have been juxtaposing that against high-polish surfaces,” he says. Yes, the outcome is as cool as it sounds.  —alisha prakash

stevenshein.com

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Kindah Khalidy

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Kindah Khalidy’s secret to career happiness? Find a space where you love to work. As a kid, the Northern California native romped around outdoors, building intricate forts out of, well, nature itself. “I would spend all day stapling leaves together into a curtain or making elaborate pine needle rugs,” Kindah explains. “I was always more geared towards grand spaces than fantasy.” And when it came to her next step, she decided to enroll at the California College of the Arts solely based on the school’s airy textile studio—a space that made her feel anything but trapped inside. “My mom and I went to look at the class, and we both were like, ‘This looks like a really fun space to work in,’” she recalls. “I need that great natural light, especially when I’m painting.”

There, Kindah began creating one-off, hand-sewn garments composed of abstract shapes in unusual color pairings. “I think a lot of designers start creating because they’re trying to fill a void—they’re conjuring up something they’re not already seeing in the market,” says the designer, now living in Berkeley. “My designs are even a little bit out of my own comfort zone. My favorite reaction is when people scream and say ‘Whoa! What is that?’”—monica derevjanik

kindahkhalidy.com

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Kindah Khalidy’s Totally Sweet NorCal Candy Tour

Some sugary fixes that look as awesome as they taste.

If you’re searching for an excuse to make a candy run, just tell everyone you’re looking for some color inspiration—that’s what Kindah Khalidy does. And, boy, does she know where to get the good stuff. Check out her favorite local sweet spots—and the pieces in her hand-painted collection they inspired. —monica derevjanik

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Cottage of Sweets, Carmel
“Cottage of Sweets isn’t in the Bay Area, but it’s my #1. It’s literally the teeniest, wood-shingled cottage, and it’s packed with candies you thought were extinct. I always recommend the made-in-house fudge and the interestingly shaped gummy candies. Jawbreakers are beautiful with the mix of primary colors splattered all over—I’m really into the mix of color and negative space, and I had fun mixing the two on a clutch.”
(Ocean Ave. between Monte Verde and Lincoln; cottageofsweets.com)

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Powell’s Sweet Shoppe, Berkeley
“Powell’s has that Willy Wonka wonderland factor. It’s a large space fully stocked with lots of wicker baskets of hard-to-find classic candies. They even have most of my favorite Haribo gummies.”
(3206 College Ave., Berkeley; powellsss.com)

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Miette, Oakland
“Miette has four locations, and each is unique in its own way. I love this store because it displays its confections in such a way that one can appreciate them as art. Their macaroons are very good and are made without food coloring.”
(85 Webster St., Oakland; miette.com)

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Ici, Berkeley
“Ici is small and slightly feminine—and always has a line of customers running down the entire block. They have all these flavors of ice cream, sorbets, and ices…and then bonbons and other frozen treats. Their cones have a decent amount of chocolate inside, and you can get them in bouquet-like packages for takeout. I actually gifted one to my boyfriend once as a manly alternative to a bouquet of flowers.”
(2948 College Ave., Berkeley; ici-icecream.com)

Wanna satisfy a sweet tooth? Kindah’s Cotton Candy Clutch is absolutely your fix.

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Weather Vain: Joshua Tree, California - 54 and Partly Cloudy

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Take a hike—we wish someone would tell us that today and that we’d get to jet west to chill with some Joshua trees and desert wildlife. Here’s what we’d wear after a morning making our way up Warren Peak. —erica

Clockwise from top left: 

+ A Topo Designs bag that can hold things that qualify as gear—and plenty of water.

+ An easy-to-slip-on cuff by Giles & Brother fit for fire-pitting with friends at the Mojave Sands Motel.

+ Theyskens’ Theory boots that are hardly hike-appropriate but can totally handle some bumpy terrain.

+ The sort of leather-accented denim shirt by Iro that will look approp at Crossroads Cafe.

+ A Leigh & Luca scarf—cause you know it’s gonna get cold when the sun goes down.

+ Rag & Bone camo pants that will blend right in with the cacti.

+ A poncho! Feels right, no? This cozy Vince one will make you want to troll the farmers’ market for dates (as in, the kind you eat) all day.

More weather-plus-destination dressing! Here!

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Richer Poorer Gets Moody With Socks

There’s a vibe and a guy in mind—yes, these socks are something special.

When he’s coming up with scorching new sock patterns, Richer Poorer’s whiz-bang designer Joe Tornatzky scours a super-secret list of vintage shops in the nooks of Long Beach, looking to flesh out not only what each pair in a collection will look like but who’s the guy who’d wear it. Here, three looks at how deep that goes. —seth putnam

Get you hands (and feet!) on these designs tomorrow! Sign up for our newsletter now.

The Mood: “This one’s all about confidence. Stripes are classic, and they’re instilled in American life. They go along with your baseball shirt on the sandlot—and they’ll live on ephemerally.”
The Man: “This person is detail-oriented and knows what he wants. He doesn’t like to show off quite as much, and he values humility.”

The Mood: “It’s a stripe and a tribal insignia mixed together, so you’ve got a unique sense of timelessness along with an earthy feeling. On a general level, that Southwestern imagery is the direction fashion is going right now. But on a deeper level, I think it symbolizes a return to a more primitive world—a realization that getting stuck in a computer chair is no fun.”
The Man: “They’re for someone who’s expressive but likes to live within the restrictions of design. He’s a subtle extrovert who understands the introverted parts of life. It’s all about balance.“

The Mood: “Loud and expressive—they scream, ‘I’m me!’ When we’re designing, we start out with a huge mood board of colors, patterns, and shapes. There’s a page of sock outlines that we’ll sketch ideas into to give it more of a handcrafted element. And as socks go, this design is high-def.”
The Man: “These are for the strong-willed guy, the extrovert who goes all the way.”

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