Amira Marion’s 7 Step Guide to Having the BEST Time in Antigua, Guatemala

If you didn’t want to go before…

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Holy whoa.

Growing up in Ann Arbor, Michigan, Amira Mason, didn’t really understand the amazingness that was her childhood home. “My parents had spent a lot of time in Guatemala in the seventies, so my house had a lot of textiles and wall hangings from their travels,” she says. “I was blind to them at first.” When she got older, though, Amira began appreciating those vibrant surroundings—and decided to create a home décor company, Archive New York, to pay tribute. Today, Amira makes regular trips to Antigua, a Spanish colonial town in Guatemala, on her way to the lake where most of her fabrics are woven, and with her travels come tips—lots of ‘em—that this quasi-native is very down to share with us. —maura brannigan

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1) To Visit: Colegio de San Jerónimo
“These ruins were built in 1759—it was originally a school for friars. The building was destroyed by an earthquake just 14 years later. But today, it’s a peaceful garden with great views of Volcán de Agua, the volcano Agua.”
(Corner of Alameda de Santa Lucia and 1a Calle Poniente)

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2) To Eat, Pt. 1: Sabe Rico
“Sabe Rico is a little restaurant-slash-café with seating in this lush tropical garden backyard. The menu is extensive, and they have nice juices and smoothies.”
(6a. Avenida Sur 7)

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3) To Stay: Casa Santo Domingo
“This hotel is arguably the most beautiful place to stay in Antigua. The building was once a convent that was partially destroyed by that earthquake in 1773, and the hotel was built around its ruins. Even if you don’t stay here, it’s still well-worth a visit to wander the gardens and peak into one of the many museums.”
(3a. Calle Oriente 28)

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4) To Eat, Pt. 2: Hector’s Bistro
“Hector’s is a super, super cute little French spot with great food and a nice ambiance. It’s right across from the bright yellow La Merced, which is an impressive 16th century church—definitely worth a visit, too!”
(1ra. Calle Poniente 9A)

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5) To Shop: Nim Po’t
“Nim Po’t has such a great collection huipilstraditional blouses—from all over Guatemala, and the prices are good. They also sell postcards, coffee, chocolate—so it’s a great place to get some souvenirs to bring back home.”
(5a. Avenida Norte)

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6) To Eat, Pt. 3: Quesos y Vinos
“Quesos y Vinos is right in an old, gated house just near the city center. I definitely recommend sitting on the candle-lit patio and ordering some brick-oven pizza and wine.”
(5ta. Avenida Norte 32A)

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7) To Snack: Helados Exoticos
“This place is a tiny ice cream spot right off the central square. They serve up some crazy flavors like sweet potato pie, apple & chipotle, wasabi fig, and one of my favorites, mezcal.”
(4ta. Avenia 5A)

Amira has an edition coming tomorrow that will make you happy even if you’re not traveling further than your couch.

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Hit the 6 Best (Sunniest!) Spots in Honolulu with Jess Shedlock

Shave-ice amazingness, here we come.

If you are lucky enough to spend some time in Hawaii, you know the slice-of-paradise reputation is no joke. Honolulu native Jess Shedlock may live in Los Angeles these days, but her beach-bombshell clothing line Wonderland Honolulu totally knows its roots. These are the half dozen places she visits when she Pacific-hops home. —jane gauger

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Sandy Beach Park
“A blazing hot beach with pounding shorebreak and a couple fun surf spots off to the side—it’s a great place to see what’s trending in bikinis!”

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Waiola Shave Ice
“Nothing better than a shave ice after a long surf sesh! Plain coconut is my all-time favorite.”
(2135 Waiola St.)

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Duke Kahanamoku Statue at Kuhio Beach Park
The Duke Kahanamoku statue is in the heart of Waikiki, where tourists and locals mix to celebrate the sport of surfing and heritage of Hawai’i. You can walk straight out to the water from behind the statue and paddle to Queen’s Surf Beach, a popular surf break. The spot is otherwise not accessible because of the breakwalls.”

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Peace Cafe
“Amazing vegan café—the food is full of flavor, and it has the nicest staff! I love the BBQ tempeh and the Heart & Seoul, their take on a bibimbap.”
(2239 S. King St.)

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Homecoming Boutique
“This is my go-to for just about everything in my closet that isn’t from my own line, from everyday basics to something really special for the occasional night out. It has the cutest shop dog ever!”
(12 S. King St. #104)

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Kahuku Land Farm Stands
The stands are set up right outside the fence of Kahuku Land Farm on the northeast side of the island. I like the banana lumpia, a pie-type filling wrapped up in a lumpia wrapper, which is like an egg roll, but very thin and a little flakier. They are super-good, but my favorite thing is coconut mochi because I am a coconut fanatic!”
(56-781 Kamehameha Hwy)

Jess’s shorts are perfect for a day of exploring in Hawaii—or just hangin’ out at home.

 

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5 Things Melanie Abrantes Says You Gotta Check Out in Rio de Janeiro

You know all that footballing made you want to head to Brazil…

Before Melanie Abrantes got way into wood and cork—turning the straight-from-nature materials into tremendously cool planters and cake stands—she had another infatuation: soccer. “I played all through high school; I was obsessed,” she says. “I had to go to Brazil for the World Cup!” Between games and celebrations, here’s what she explored in and around Rio de Janeiro—stuff totally worth planning a trip around now that those festive Germans have packed their bags. —genevieve ang

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See: Jardim Botânico
“I’ve never been in such a beautiful garden—it was established by the Portuguese king in the early 1800s. We only walked through about a quarter of it, and we were there for two hours. It has a ton of native Brazilian plants and also a jungle—where we saw monkeys!—and an Amazon rainforest section with giant lily pads.”

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Do: Chill at the beach!
“If Brazilians are not at the beach, I really don’t know where they are. It’s definitely the thing to do. People from Rio do this thing where they go to a specific beach every week at the same time with the same group of friends. Each beach has a very specific audience and also has a very unique tile pattern that was designed by artist Roberto Burle Marx. I would recommend Ipanema for younger people—lots of beautiful-people watching!”

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Shop: Dona Coisa
“There are a lot of artist studios in the area around Jardim Botânico, and one store in particular that I loved was Dona Coisa—they have a coffee shop on the top floor, a really adorable apothecary-type store below, and avant-garde fashion on the floor below that. Brazilian arts and crafts make the best souvenirs—anything imported is super-expensive, but they have very reasonably priced and beautiful trinkets—and hammocks. After you lay in one, you’re going to want one for sure.”
(R. Lopes Quintas, 153)

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Eat: Pastel de Nata
“There’s a place in downtown Rio that’s been around since the 1800s called Confeitaria Colombo. It’s in the middle of the city and is two floors, lined with mirrors and glass. A must-try is their pastel de nata, or Portuguese egg tart, which has now also become a Brazilian tradition. Literally nothing has changed at Confeitaria Colombo since it first opened—you can see a photo of what it looked like previously, and the only things different are people’s clothes!”
(Rua Goncalves Dias, 32)

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Visit: Buzios
“This is a beach town around three hours south of Rio. We had to take a boat there, and there are a lot of beaches that you can only access by water taxis. It’s where all the Brazilians go to vacation.”

Melanie has an edition for tomorrow that you’ll love coming home to.

 

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Japanstagrams: 14 Tokyo Spots That Claire’s Still Talking about, 2 Months Later

I’ve found that trying to explain my intense attraction to Tokyo (the first and longest stop on my honeymoon) is surprisingly challenging—it’s such an overwhelming city that distilling it down to something digestible feels like a crazily daunting task. So here’s my best shot at it: the 14 spots I’m still forcing everyone to listen to me talk about over and over again. —claire

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RAAGF Bunny Cafe
The cat cafes in Tokyo get a lot of love, but bunny hang-time is much harder to come by. Here you’ll pay to have tea with some rabbits for half an hour, and, if you’re a good friend, you’ll shell out some extra yen to take home a rabbit-sized kimono for your business partner’s pet Patsy.

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Higashiya Ginza  
This place embodies so many of the things I love about Japan into one little shop—beautiful ceramics, exotic pastries presented like fine art, delicious teas prepared with ceremonial flourish, and a prime example of Japan’s unique brand of hospitality.

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Sacai
The Japanese are big into presentation, and the retail stores are no exception. Brands like Commes des Garçons and Issey Miyake tend to dominate the high-end retail areas, and they feel as much like contemporary art museums as shops (a motif that’s echoed in their strict “no photos” rule). Cult indie-brand Sacai’s flagship is a smaller and more concentrated take on a similar theme—both the architecture and the clothes are striking and uniquely Japanese. 

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246 Common
In a nutshell: Tokyo’s take on Smorgasburg. It’s an outdoor beer garden and food court with shipping containers for seating areas and ping pong tables as dining surfaces, packed with super-social 20- and 30-somethings. It all feels very Tokyo-does-Brooklyn, and not just because Brooklyn Brewery is the beverage of choice. 

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LOFT Shibuya
Head straight to the basement level of this place, where I spent too many hours and too many dollars on their incredible collection of stationery and pens, which were totally unlike any I’ve seen at home. It brought me straight back to my days of sticker books. 

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7-Eleven
Yep, that 7-11. The convenience store. Not kidding when I tell you it was one of the most intriguing shops we visited. The items I deemed worthy of suitcase space: many varieties of rice balls, Mike popcorn, and green-tea-flavored Kit Kats.

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Nakameguro
This shopping and residential neighborhood feels most akin to Venice, California. Situated along a gorgeous riverbank, it’s super-hip, laid-back, and full of tiny and well-curated boutiques and vintage shops. The don’t-miss spot here is Taste and Sense—grab lunch at the cafe and browse the attached retail spots while you digest.

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Hakusan Porcelain
I left Japan with a major ceramics obsession, and this place is at the root of it. The company is over 400 years old and specializes in simple porcelain dishes. I fell hard for their patterned, mismatched rice bowls, and since Jamie and Kevin had given us a check as our wedding gift and instructed us to buy something on our honeymoon with it, these seemed like an obvious choice.

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Omotesando Koffee
A beautifully designed hole-in-the-wall shop serving meticulously made cups of coffee. Treat yourself to the mocha version.

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Maisen
This is a veritable institution that’s been serving the same delicious food for years and years. The thing to get here is tonkatsu, a lightly breaded and deep-fried pork cutlet smothered in a completely addictive curry sauce. (N.B. If you were ever going to make an exception to your meat-free, gluten-free diet, this would be the place to do it.)

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Golden Gai
A singularly unique bar-hopping experience, Golden Gai is a handful of alleyways filled with teeny-tiny drinking establishments, each with its own theme. The largest ones are big enough for about 10 people, but most fit only four to six. The proprietors and patrons are all super-friendly, and our night spent sipping sake alongside them taught us more about Tokyo culture than most other activities.

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Gyoza Ro
The best dumplings in Tokyo, served in a totally unassuming setting at wonderfully low prices. The entire menu fits on a 5-by-7 card, and you should order everything on it twice—especially the little vegetable dishes like miso cucumbers and pickled cabbage.

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Park Hyatt
Come for the views, the Lost in Translation vibes, and the bircher muesli on the breakfast menu. Leave with a pretty comprehensive sense of how the Japanese do luxury and hospitality.

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Kappabashi Shopping District
After a few days in Tokyo, you’ll be dying to know where to find the stunning ceramics and lacquerware all your meals are served on. Head to this restaurant-supply neighborhood to get it all at shockingly low prices. This is also where you’ll find Kamata, a world-famous knife shop. (Just don’t try to pack your new blades in your carry-on.)

We have a lot more travel ideas, if you’re looking to do a deep-dive.

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7 Austin Must-Hits From Orly Genger and Jaclyn Mayer

Art museums and cowboy boots (y’all).

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Gotta love a work trip that doubles as a vacation. When Jaclyn Mayer and Orly Genger got the chance to head to Austin—both to do a trunk show for their slick jewelry line and an event for one of Orly’s sicker-than-sick art installations—they made a whole thing of it. They booked a three-day trip, shacked up at the architect Charles Moore’s former house—that’s Jaclyn standing in front of its sick pool above­—and hit the town. Here’s what they think every visitor ought to tackle. —alisha prakash

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Orly: “On Thursday night, I gave a talk about my installation in front of my piece at Laguna Gloria. My piece is called Current and is made out of reclaimed lobster rope that I hand-knotted and painted, then constructed on-site. Laguna Gloria is a beautiful and peaceful location—which I did not want to compete with, but rather embrace. I designed the piece to echo the structural elements of the amphitheater that is already there and built out a barge so that the piece could connect the land to water.”
(3809 W. 35th St.)

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Jaclyn: “We did a little shopping tour of Austin. One of our favorite shops was JM Dry Goods. They specialize in crafts such as weavings, ceramics, jewelry, and clothing. I purchased a lovely Mexican kaftan, perfect for the beach”
(215 S. Lamar, Ste. C)

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Jaclyn: “One afternoon we went to Barton Springs, a staple in Austin. It’s a natural swimming hole where you can get relief from the heat. All you need is five minutes in the cold water, and you’re ready to get back to all the fun Austin has to offer.”
(2201 Barton Springs Rd.)

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Jaclyn: “One of my favorite things to do is to find flea markets. Uncommon Objects is a fun indoor one with loads of bits and bobs. Unfortunately, we didn’t purchase anything this trip—luggage space was tight!”
(1512 S. Congress Ave.)

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Jaclyn: “And of course you can’t leave Austin without shopping for some cowboy boots! Next to Uncommon Objects was this crazy boot shop, Allens Boots. It was fun to look at all the insane patterns and leather!”
(1522 S. Congress Ave.)

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Jaclyn: “On Saturday night, we went to Sway, this beautiful Thai restaurant with an open kitchen. We got to sit at the bar and watch them cook all the meals.”
(1417 S. 1st St.)

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Jaclyn: “One of the reasons for our trip was a trunk show at the shop Valentine’s Too.  Trunk shows are always fun as they are some of the few times we get to personally pick out jewelry for people. It is always a great experience to watch someone fall in love with a piece.”(3801 N. Capital of Texas Hwy)

Photo of art installation courtesy of Brian Fitzsimmons of The Contemporary Austin.

You’ve gotta see the ring these two made—it’s a total hit in our book.

 

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City Haul: Where We Eat and Shop in Austin *and* L.A.

This week, Claire and I are headed west. Our itinerary: Austin, L.A., and Vegas. And though we can’t really comment on the latter—you know, what happens in Vegas…—we did want to share the places we’ll be visiting in destinations #1 and #2. In fact! We told Conde Nast Traveler alllll about our go-tos, and so for the full run-down, you best click on through. —erica

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AUSTIN! From tacos at La Condesa (pictured!) to warm-weather-appropriate sweaters from Kick Pleat to oysters as often as we can get them—more here.

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LOS ANGELES! We’re westside girls, and the are the Venice/West Hollywood/Santa Monica/Brentwood—like Tenoversix, shown up there!—that we’re hitting, for surez. This way for the scoop.

For more city-guide madness, click!

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7 Echo Park Spots Kathleen Whitaker Says You Gotta Check Out

Ahh—a ‘hood that has it all.

Why does the jewelry designer Kathleen Whitaker love Echo Park so freaking much? “I don’t need to leave the zip code. I can walk my dog and hit it all, which is a rare thing in L.A.,” she explains. “It’s loaded with so many working, accomplished artists, designers, chefs, filmmakers, musicians, and architects.” And it’s packed with the sort of vintage shops and snack emporiums that make you want to move in next door. Check out Kathleen’s must-hits. —alisha prakash

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Fix
“Fix a low-maintenance, neighborhood-y, easy, convenient place to go—and it happens to have a lot of great coffee. In the mornings, my husband and I will walk from our house with the dog and stay for a cup of coffee and walk back.”
(2100 Echo Park Ave.)

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Echo X Park Artist Studio
“Peter Shire is an Echo Park institution—a ceramicist and sculptor. There’s a large green gate that covers his parking lot, but if the little doorway in the green gate is open, it means that he’s in there—and you can go in and wander into his studio and take a look around.”
(1850 Echo Park Ave.)

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Beatrice Valenzuela
“Beatrice Valenzuela is a very old friend of mine. She’s been cutting my hair for about nine years. In this period of time that I’ve known her, she’s started making shoes, styling people, and creating the Echo Park Craft Fair. And this year, she opened her flagship store. She carries work by some local people like myself and my friends Samantha Grisdale and Agnes Baddoo and also carries imported goods from Chiapas and Oaxaca.”
(1547 Echo Park Ave.)

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Cookbook
“Cookbook is a tiny grocery store run by Robert Stelzner and Marta Teegan. It has prepared foods and pantry items and a whole bunch of dry goods. Everything is so well-sourced that you could go in there blindfolded, and no matter you took back with you, it would be discovery and the best thing in your kitchen. They have Straus Family Creamery, tons of amazing cheeses, and Fever-Tree ginger beer, which is so delicious.”
(1549 Echo Park Ave.)

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Tavin Boutique
“Erin Tavin used to be a stylist, and she opened her own store of vintage clothes. She goes all over the country to source the vintage that she carries—she has a really interesting, flamboyant point of view. You’ll find really old stuff—Victorian lace dresses—all the way to awesome pre-owned Isabel Marant or Pierre Cardin.”
(1534 Echo Park Ave.)

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Lucas Echo Park
“Lucas is a salon that also offers facials by this woman, Tracy Marcellino, who is actually a musician. She’s a lead in a major band. She used to be in Twilight Sleep and is now in Oh Boy Les Mecs. and her husband is also a musician in a popular band called Silversun Pickups. She got her esthetician’s license on the side. I’m a facial whore, and she’s really, really good.”
(1541 Echo Park Ave.)

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The Time Travel Mart
“If you go into The Time Travel Mart, it almost looks like a 7-Eleven—it’s built like a convenience store—but all of the products in there are sci-fi and from-the-future (curiosities like hand soaps you can only use on Mars). It’s a really bizarre place, but kooky and awesome in the best possible way. It’s a nonprofit, so all of that is a front for raising money for children and literacy.”
(1714 W. Sunset Blvd.)

Beatrice Valenzuela photo courtesy of Nancy Neil Photography; Cookbook photo courtesy of Bradford Whitaker.

Take a look at the rad matte gold studs Kathleen made for her newest edition!

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Head to Palm Springs With the Workhorse Jewelry Trio

Three gals, one desert love affair.

Designers Nicole and Amber Sutton and Zoë Chicco­—the threesome behind the rad jewelry line Workhorse—have a thing for Palm Springs. Like, a MAJOR thing: They all escape L.A. to spend time in the desert about as much as possible. Here, some of the reasons why. —alisha prakash

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Zoe: “My husband and I rented a house in Palm Springs for the month of September, and it was glorious. Most of our time was spent swimming, taking morning and evening walks with our dog Rocco, enjoying meals and cocktails with friends, and going to our favorite local haunts.”

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Birba
Amber: “We absolutely love Birba—the food is delish, the drinks are fantastic, and the al fresco ambiance is bar none. I order a pizza every time—typically the white pizza with potato, gorgonzola, ricotta, rosemary, and basil. Drinks on the patio are a must, and I highly recommend the Heated Snake, which has 100% agave tequila, fresh lime, lemon, triple sec, and habanero.”
(622 N. Palm Canyon Dr.)

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The Estate Sale Co.
Amber: “The Estate Sale Co. is a multiplex of mid-century furniture, chandeliers, quirky art, and estate jewelry. The inventory rotates often, and they feature weekly tag sales where you can find treasures for less. I found a pair of Jason Miller antler sconces for Zoe that she had been coveting for months.”
(4185 E. Palm Canyon Dr.)

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Murray Hill
Zoe: “We all have dog-children who love Palm Springs just as much as we do. Weekends typically include a local hike at Murray Hill. The views are seriously amazing—you can see the whole valley, and the pups are actually allowed to roam free.”

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Koffi
Zoe: “Amber and I are iced coffee-addicts, and Koffi is our destination in the AM. A bonus is that it’s a stone’s throw from the rad Ace Hotel, so you are sure to see a hip crowd and lots of eye candy.”
(1700 S. Camino Real)

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The Sagauro
Nicole: “The Sagauro is a newer hip hotel in the area. It has a rainbow façade and two cool spots for food and drinks. Both were opened by chef Jose Garces of Iron Chef (love that show). Tinto is the fancier of the two and serves unique dishes inspired by Basque region in Spain.”
Nicole: “El Jefe has a full tequila bar and is a great gourmet taco spot. I recently went with my boyfriend and my family—we tried a few fancy tequilas, sampled all the taco options, chowed on some guac and chips, and, of course, had too many Micheladas”.
(1800 E Palm Canyon Dr.)

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Consign Design
Amber: “At Consign Design, hidden down a dirt path close to the Estate Sale, Zoe recently picked up a few display items for our studio and showroom, including a few life-size black glass heads for $35 each, When she got to the register they were marked down 40% more–score!”
(4101 Matthew Dr.)

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Workshop Kitchen + Bar
Nicole: “At Workshop Kitchen + Bar, the architecture is amazing—27-foot cathedral ceilings, concrete and steel galore, sleek lighting. It’s the epitome of industrial chic. Workshop supports local farms, and the ingredients are fresh and seasonal. We love to sit at the giant communal table that spans the entirety of the main dining area, rubbing elbows with Palm Springs glitterati, local folk in-the-know, and weekend warriors from L.A.”
(800 N. Palm Canyon Dr.)

Get a look at the pretty rad knuckle ring the ladies of Workhorse Jewelry whipped up!

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Take 5: The Spots You Really Have to Check Out in the Upper Marais

After Emily Altieri finished up her Of a Kind internship this summer, she headed to Paris for some study-abroad action. Yah, we weren’t jealous at all. So we’ve asked her to give us the scoop on her best finds around the city—and, listen, though she might be both darling and young, don’t dare accuse her of having college-girl taste. —erica

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Looking for the perfect Sunday in Paris? Head to Le Marais—partly because everywhere else is closed, but mostly because of the insanely good restaurants and ample shopping. It is also a lot more casual than the rest of Paris—we’re talking West Village versus Central Park West—but, ya know, still wildly chic. The area has grown so much that one little guide is not nearly enough, so for now: my five favorites in the 3rd Arrondissement (a.k.a., Upper Marais). emily altieri

Betjeman & Barton
At this tea bar, you’re encouraged to try out their 180 varieties—and take your favorite to-go (hard to find in France). With the communal tables, homemade scones, and hot pink teapots, this is your girly Parisian moment.
(24 Boulevard des filles du Calvaire)

Chez Janou
I was convinced that charming waiters didn’t exist in Paris until I visited this local brasserie, and the place looks like a still from a mushy French romcom. The food is also fantastic—especially the self-serve chocolate mousse, which is, as the Of a Kind team would say, NEXT LEVEL.
(2 Rue Roger Verlomme)

Merci
You just can’t go to Paris without at least a quick browse here—I forbid it, actually. The concept shop has men’s, women’s, and home sections—goodness for everyone—and there are also three cafés on-site.
(111 Boulevard Beaumarchais)

French Trotters
I died a little bit over their accessories but the clothing is also awesome—with designers like Opening Ceremony and American Vintage. The selection for guys might be even better, and that’s saying a lot.
(30 Rue de Charonne)

Closed
This co-ed German label just opened its first Paris store this fall, and I love shopping here because I know I’m finding things I cant get anywhere else. Knits, leather, denim, and shearling!
(18 Rue de Poitou)

Where else has Emily been hangin’ in Paris? More here.

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Take 5: The Places You Absolutely Can’t Miss in Paris’s 7th Arrondissement

After Emily Altieri finished up her Of a Kind internship this summer, she headed to Paris for some study-abroad action. Yah, we weren’t jealous at all. So we’ve asked her to give us the scoop on her best finds around the city—and, listen, though she might be both darling and young, don’t dare accuse her of having college-girl taste. —erica

I knew I was living in the right place when I found a clothing boutique nestled between a wine cave and a chocolate shop. Here are a handful of my favorites in the 7th arrondissement, right near the famous open-air market on Rue Cler. emily altieri

Acquaverde
French fashion can sometimes feel too stiff, but this place doesn’t at all. The Parisian label specializes in the coolest colored denim and awesome outerwear (including some pretty major varsity jackets).
(103 rue Saint-Dominique)

Aoshida Black
The size of this shop? Underwhelming. The clothes in it? The opposite. It focuses on more unknown designers from Korea, Belgium, and Denmark—stuff you definitely won’t be finding elsewhere.
(117 rue Saint-Dominique)

Michel Chaudun
As a card-carrying chocolate snob, it is my duty to test out all of the Paris spots, and, so far, this one’s my favorite. The chocolate pavé cubes are like Hershey’s kisses as chic as Emmanuelle Alt.
(149 rue de L’Université)

Brasserie Thoumieux
The décor of this French brasserie in the ultra-stylish Hotel Thomieux [Ed: Pictured up top!] is reason enough to visit—we’re talking art-nouveau light fixtures and red velvet upholstery (very Midnight in Paris). And then there’s the awesome people-watching and food…
(79 rue Saint-Dominique)

Eric Chauvin
When you walk into this tiny flower shop, the hydrangeas are so massive and the dangling vines so ridiculously lush that they create a maze-like situation. You’ll want to take some home with you, and the price tags totally allow for that.
(22 rue Jean Nicot)

What else should you do in Paris? Some more ideas here and here.

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