The Evolution of Garnett Jewelry

Let’s time-travel, shall we?

Vintage trinkets and found treasures have always guided the aesthetic of Aimee Munford’s line Garnett Jewelry, but she never lets her affection for all that’s old get, well, old. Over the years, the Virginia designer has played with wax casting and metalworking, knife charms and flowers. Here’s a look at how her handiwork has evolved through some of her favorite pieces from her archives. —carlye wisel

image
Fall 2005
"This shell and gold chain necklace is from the very beginning. I really enjoyed working with a lot of natural materials when I wasn’t working with vintage trinkets."

image
Spring 2007
"When you’re in an antique store and you’re buying something, usually it has some importance to someone along the way—that’s why it survived. So, I was playing around with the idea of retelling a story through other people’s bits and pieces—which completely changes the story since it’s my interpretation.”

image
Fall 2007
“This trophy necklace is the first piece I ever cast, and I did this one using the lost wax technique. I worked on it for months getting the wax carving perfect, and I ended up casting it in solid gold. I may never be able to part with this piece, but with the cost of gold what it is nowadays, I could probably buy a small car with what I could sell it for!”

image
Spring 2008
“During this phase of my design I was really into combining vintage and antique stuff with newer materials. I loved those little knives—I got obsessed with them, and every time I was out and would see one, I would buy it. For some reason I was into teeth at that time too—when you’re losing teeth as a kid, parents will save them, so I kind of liked the idea of something found along with a momento. The two together just seemed sort of crazy, and I liked that they are something you’re not really going to see someone else wearing.”

image
Summer 2010
"I liked how with the different stones I was working with at that time—they might all be fluorite—were all a little bit different. Some are more purple, some are more turquoise-y, and I think that makes them more unique."

image
Fall 2010
"This was the beginning of my crazy geometric-shape phase that I’m still sort of stuck in. I was really into triangles and liked basic, simple shapes."

Aimee is back in black (and white) with a foursome edition you’re gonna love!

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Aimee Munford Serves Up the Best Places to Eat in Richmond

Get ready to chow down.

“For a city the size of Richmond, the food scene is really diverse,” says Aimee Munford, the whiz behind Garnett Jewelry and a VA resident for 15 years. “We have new restaurants popping up all the time, and people are generally excited about trying new places. That’s something I love about Richmond—as a whole, it embraces creativity.” Here, a handful of spots she hits on the reg. —alisha prakash

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Kuba Kuba
“We used to live in the Fan area and could walk to dinner at Kuba Kuba. I love this spot for their apps, which I make a meal out of. I love the empanadillas—ricotta- and spinach-stuffed pastries. There is also a park across the street, so I like to take my son to play and then pop in for a Cuban press sandwich or coffee. The interior is decorated with murals by the amazing local artist Ed Trask.”
(1601 Park Ave.)

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Mamma Zu
“We usually end up at Mamma Zu for birthday dinners and when family comes to town. We did a lot of takeout from here when our son was first born. It’s the ultimate in comforting, home-cooked food when you don’t want to do the cooking yourself.”
(501 S. Pine St.)

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Crossroads Coffee & Ice Cream
“Crossroads serves locally made desserts and ice cream made by Bev’s. It is about a five-minute walk from our house, so we love to go after dinner sometimes for a cone. They have decadent flavors like chocolate peanut butter brownie and a great pear sorbet.”
(3600 Forest Hill Ave.)

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Ruang Tong Thai
“Ruang Tong is also really close to home, but we usually do take out. One of my favorite dishes is the som tum salad with papaya, tomatoes, lime juice, and roasted peanuts. It makes for a refreshing and light dinner. It’s a go-to on summer nights when it feels too hot to cook.”
(6790 Forest Hill Ave.)

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The Black Sheep
“I have two favorites at The Black Sheep: the Sloppy JoJo Sandwich—red and green lentils stewed with peppers and onions in tomato sauce, served on a buttered, toasted bun and topped with pickled jalapeno, onion, and carrot—and the grapefruit salad, which is an interesting mix of grapefruit, avocado, jicama, cashews, red cabbage, basil, and mint with lime vinaigrette. They serve Abita root beer, which is hands-down the best root beer. The owner, Kevin, is a long-time friend of my husband’s and has a daughter a little younger than our son.”
(901 W. Marshall St.)

Aimee’s newest edition gives you four more reasons to love Garnett Jewelry!

comments, reblogs & likes

Notes

11 notes

The Evolution of Garnett Jewelry

Let’s time-travel, shall we?

Vintage trinkets and found treasures have always guided the aesthetic of Aimee Munford’s line Garnett Jewelry, but she never lets her affection for all that’s old get, well, old. Over the years, the Virginia designer has played with wax casting and metalworking, knife charms and flowers. Here’s a look at how her handiwork has evolved through some of her favorite pieces from her archives. —carlye wisel

image
Fall 2005
"This shell and gold chain necklace is from the very beginning. I really enjoyed working with a lot of natural materials when I wasn’t working with vintage trinkets."

image
Spring 2007
"When you’re in an antique store and you’re buying something, usually it has some importance to someone along the way—that’s why it survived. So, I was playing around with the idea of retelling a story through other people’s bits and pieces—which completely changes the story since it’s my interpretation.”

image
Fall 2007
“This trophy necklace is the first piece I ever cast, and I did this one using the lost wax technique. I worked on it for months getting the wax carving perfect, and I ended up casting it in solid gold. I may never be able to part with this piece, but with the cost of gold what it is nowadays, I could probably buy a small car with what I could sell it for!”

image
Spring 2008
“During this phase of my design I was really into combining vintage and antique stuff with newer materials. I loved those little knives—I got obsessed with them, and every time I was out and would see one, I would buy it. For some reason I was into teeth at that time too—when you’re losing teeth as a kid, parents will save them, so I kind of liked the idea of something found along with a momento. The two together just seemed sort of crazy, and I liked that they are something you’re not really going to see someone else wearing.”

image
Summer 2010
"I liked how with the different stones I was working with at that time—they might all be fluorite—were all a little bit different. Some are more purple, some are more turquoise-y, and I think that makes them more unique."

image
Fall 2010
"This was the beginning of my crazy geometric-shape phase that I’m still sort of stuck in. I was really into triangles and liked basic, simple shapes."

Aimee’s back! Get her latest berry-hued edition while the getting’s good.

comments, reblogs & likes

Notes

9 notes

Bright Ideas from Garnett Jewelry

A case of the pre-baby color crazies.

image
Some of the hues Aimee is hot on right now with one of the swatches that speaks to her.

With a little one on the way [Ed: now born!], Garnett Jewelry designer Aimee Munford is getting really (surprisingly!) chipper. “I think being pregnant has drawn on my playful side,” she confesses. “The bright colors, the fun little shapes and stuff—I’ve been inspired by the planning process.” Take a look at how her prenatal-ness has impacted her work. —carlye wisel

image
“I was feeling like I was stuck in a rut, doing so much in just gold and silver. I loved the dullness of the brass mixed with the super bright colors—some of them are almost neon.”

image
“I like the way these colors work together…but how the colors are strong enough that just by themselves, they work as well.”

image
“God, I went through so much paint before I settled on these colors. They just feel like the epitome of spring—just bright and fun.”

image
“The yellow I used is a really bright yellow—not a quiet yellow.”

image
“It just amazes me that something that started from a really simple piece can be transformed in so many different ways and take on so many different looks.” 

Score the latest Garnett edition! This trio of bracelets is BERRY rad.

comments, reblogs & likes

Notes

16 notes

The Evolution of Garnett Jewelry

Let’s time-travel, shall we?

Vintage trinkets and found treasures have always guided the aesthetic of Aimee Munford’s line Garnett Jewelry, but she never lets her affection for all that’s old get, well, old. Over the years, the Virginia designer has played with wax casting and metalworking, knife charms and flowers. Here’s a look at how her handiwork has evolved through some of her favorite pieces from her archives. —carlye wisel


Fall 2005
"This shell and gold chain necklace is from the very beginning. I really enjoyed working with a lot of natural materials when I wasn’t working with vintage trinkets."


Spring 2007
"When you’re in an antique store and you’re buying something, usually it has some importance to someone along the way—that’s why it survived. So, I was playing around with the idea of retelling a story through other people’s bits and pieces—which completely changes the story since it’s my interpretation.”


Fall 2007
“This trophy necklace is the first piece I ever cast, and I did this one using the lost wax technique. I worked on it for months getting the wax carving perfect, and I ended up casting it in solid gold. I may never be able to part with this piece, but with the cost of gold what it is nowadays, I could probably buy a small car with what I could sell it for!”


Spring 2008
“During this phase of my design I was really into combining vintage and antique stuff with newer materials. I loved those little knives—I got obsessed with them, and every time I was out and would see one, I would buy it. For some reason I was into teeth at that time too—when you’re losing teeth as a kid, parents will save them, so I kind of liked the idea of something found along with a momento. The two together just seemed sort of crazy, and I liked that they are something you’re not really going to see someone else wearing.”


Summer 2010
"I liked how with the different stones I was working with at that time—they might all be fluorite—were all a little bit different. Some are more purple, some are more turquoise-y, and I think that makes them more unique."


Fall 2010
"This was the beginning of my crazy geometric-shape phase that I’m still sort of stuck in. I was really into triangles and liked basic, simple shapes."

Aimee’s third edition is here! Get her stack of green ID bracelets while you can.

comments, reblogs & likes

Notes

15 notes

Bright Ideas from Garnett Jewelry

A case of the pre-baby color crazies.


Some of the hues Aimee is hot on right now with one of the swatches that speaks to her.

With a little one on the way [Ed: now born!], Garnett Jewelry designer Aimee Munford is getting really (surprisingly!) chipper. “I think being pregnant has drawn on my playful side,” she confesses. “The bright colors, the fun little shapes and stuff—I’ve been inspired by the planning process.” Take a look at how her prenatal-ness has impacted her work. —carlye wisel


“I was feeling like I was stuck in a rut, doing so much in just gold and silver. I loved the dullness of the brass mixed with the super bright colors—some of them are almost neon.”


“I like the way these colors work together…but how the colors are strong enough that just by themselves, they work as well.”


“God, I went through so much paint before I settled on these colors. They just feel like the epitome of spring—just bright and fun.”


“The yellow I used is a really bright yellow—not a quiet yellow.”


“It just amazes me that something that started from a really simple piece can be transformed in so many different ways and take on so many different looks.” 

Color of the day: green. Score Aimee’s trio of green ID bracelets before they’re allllll gone.

comments, reblogs & likes

Notes

10 notes

The Evolution of Garnett Jewelry

Let’s time-travel, shall we?

Vintage trinkets and found treasures have always guided the aesthetic of Aimee Munford’s line Garnett Jewelry, but she never lets her affection for all that’s old get, well, old. Over the years, the Virginia designer has played with wax casting and metalworking, knife charms and flowers. Here’s a look at how her handiwork has evolved through some of her favorite pieces from her archives. —carlye wisel


Fall 2005
"This shell and gold chain necklace is from the very beginning. I really enjoyed working with a lot of natural materials when I wasn’t working with vintage trinkets."


Spring 2007
"When you’re in an antique store and you’re buying something, usually it has some importance to someone along the way—that’s why it survived. So, I was playing around with the idea of retelling a story through other people’s bits and pieces—which completely changes the story since it’s my interpretation.”


Fall 2007
“This trophy necklace is the first piece I ever cast, and I did this one using the lost wax technique. I worked on it for months getting the wax carving perfect, and I ended up casting it in solid gold. I may never be able to part with this piece, but with the cost of gold what it is nowadays, I could probably buy a small car with what I could sell it for!”


Spring 2008
“During this phase of my design I was really into combining vintage and antique stuff with newer materials. I loved those little knives—I got obsessed with them, and every time I was out and would see one, I would buy it. For some reason I was into teeth at that time too—when you’re losing teeth as a kid, parents will save them, so I kind of liked the idea of something found along with a momento. The two together just seemed sort of crazy, and I liked that they are something you’re not really going to see someone else wearing.”


Summer 2010
"I liked how with the different stones I was working with at that time—they might all be fluorite—were all a little bit different. Some are more purple, some are more turquoise-y, and I think that makes them more unique."


Fall 2010
"This was the beginning of my crazy geometric-shape phase that I’m still sort of stuck in. I was really into triangles and liked basic, simple shapes."

Something tells us that Aimee’s 2nd Of a Kind edition will go as quickly as her first did. Get this trio of blue bracelets while you can.

comments, reblogs & likes

Notes

11 notes

Bright Ideas from Garnett Jewelry

A case of the pre-baby color crazies.


Some of the hues Aimee is hot on right now with one of the swatches that speaks to her.

With a little one on the way [Ed: now born!], Garnett Jewelry designer Aimee Munford is getting really (surprisingly!) chipper. “I think being pregnant has drawn on my playful side,” she confesses. “The bright colors, the fun little shapes and stuff—I’ve been inspired by the planning process.” Take a look at how her prenatal-ness has impacted her work. —carlye wisel


“I was feeling like I was stuck in a rut, doing so much in just gold and silver. I loved the dullness of the brass mixed with the super bright colors—some of them are almost neon.”


“I like the way these colors work together…but how the colors are strong enough that just by themselves, they work as well.”


“God, I went through so much paint before I settled on these colors. They just feel like the epitome of spring—just bright and fun.”


“The yellow I used is a really bright yellow—not a quiet yellow.”


“It just amazes me that something that started from a really simple piece can be transformed in so many different ways and take on so many different looks.” 

Score Aimee’s second Of a Kind edition now: This trio of blue ID bracelets keeps the color gods happy.

comments, reblogs & likes

Notes

18 notes

Bright Ideas from Garnett Jewelry

A case of the pre-baby color crazies.


Some of the hues Aimee is hot on right now with one of the swatches that speaks to her.

With a little one on the way, Garnett Jewelry designer Aimee Munford is getting really (surprisingly!) chipper. “I think being pregnant has drawn on my playful side,” she confesses. “The bright colors, the fun little shapes and stuff—I’ve been inspired by the planning process.” Take a look at how her prenatal-ness has impacted her work. —carlye wisel

Score the amazing trio of painted I.D. bracelets Aimee made just for Of a Kind! Color us impressed.


“I was feeling like I was stuck in a rut, doing so much in just gold and silver. I loved the dullness of the brass mixed with the super bright colors—some of them are almost neon.”


“I like the way these colors work together…but how the colors are strong enough that just by themselves, they work as well.”


“God, I went through so much paint before I settled on these colors. They just feel like the epitome of spring—just bright and fun.”


“The yellow I used is a really bright yellow—not a quiet yellow.”


“It just amazes me that something that started from a really simple piece can be transformed in so many different ways and take on so many different looks.” [Ed: Scoop up your I.D. bracelet trio while you can!]

comments, reblogs & likes

Notes

29 notes

The Evolution of Garnett Jewelry

Let’s time-travel, shall we?

Vintage trinkets and found treasures have always guided the aesthetic of Aimee Munford’s line Garnett Jewelry, but she never lets her affection for all that’s old get, well, old. Over the years, the Virginia designer has played with wax casting and metalworking, knife charms and flowers. Here’s a look at how her handiwork has evolved through some of her favorite pieces from her archives. —carlye wisel


Fall 2005
"This shell and gold chain necklace is from the very beginning. I really enjoyed working with a lot of natural materials when I wasn’t working with vintage trinkets."


Spring 2007
"When you’re in an antique store and you’re buying something, usually it has some importance to someone along the way—that’s why it survived. So, I was playing around with the idea of retelling a story through other people’s bits and pieces—which completely changes the story since it’s my interpretation.”


Fall 2007
“This trophy necklace is the first piece I ever cast, and I did this one using the lost wax technique. I worked on it for months getting the wax carving perfect, and I ended up casting it in solid gold. I may never be able to part with this piece, but with the cost of gold what it is nowadays, I could probably buy a small car with what I could sell it for!”


Spring 2008
“During this phase of my design I was really into combining vintage and antique stuff with newer materials. I loved those little knives—I got obsessed with them, and every time I was out and would see one, I would buy it. For some reason I was into teeth at that time too—when you’re losing teeth as a kid, parents will save them, so I kind of liked the idea of something found along with a momento. The two together just seemed sort of crazy, and I liked that they are something you’re not really going to see someone else wearing.”


Summer 2010
"I liked how with the different stones I was working with at that time—they might all be fluorite—were all a little bit different. Some are more purple, some are more turquoise-y, and I think that makes them more unique."


Fall 2010
"This was the beginning of my crazy geometric-shape phase that I’m still sort of stuck in. I was really into triangles and liked basic, simple shapes."

To score Aimee’s latest creation,—a set of three rad I.D. bracelets that she made just for Of a Kind—click here.

comments, reblogs & likes

Notes

76 notes