Swing by Winifred Grace’s Airy New Chicago Store

First shop = HUGE milestone.

“Since I have long said if I was not a jewelry designer, I would be an interior designer, this whole process has been a dream come true,” says Winifred Grace, of the boutique-slash-studio she opened in May 2014. Even better: It’s just four blocks from her home in Chicago’s Andersonville. “Since everything is mobile, it can be transformed so easily. Eventually I’d like to offer the space up for parties,” she says. See what else she has in-store (heh)—and pick up some décor tips along the way. —alisha prakash

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“This is an old German woodworking bench. Its sleek size fits perfectly in the front of the store, and it also serves as a great display for belts and small trays of jewelry. That carved Moroccan mirror was a consignment store purchase in Naples, Florida, and it is a great size—it’s almost full-length.”

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“Vintage wooden letter trays—from Roost Chicago—make the best displays. They give structure to a small collection of pieces, whether it’s jewelry, scarves, or leather goods. As my inventory changes, I can easily switch them around to accommodate different product. I cut a piece of brown leather to fit the bottom, so the jewelry has nice padding and didn’t slip and slide on the wood.”

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“The long wooden table is actually an old folding wallpaper table, also from Roost Chicago. It is a great height for my cashwrap but is lightweight and mobile enough to be moved around the store as things evolve. Oh, and that blue wall is actually completely mobile—we built it on wheels so we can move it around the store as needed.”

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“The floors are the original terrazzo, which I adore. There are slim brass divider strips that run throughout—a very subtle reference to my jewelry. It was one of the things I fell in love with about the space. I bought that rug for $35 at the Sandwich Flea Market. It made my three-hour trek there and back worth it!”

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“I wanted to come up with as many creative solutions as I could for the space. This included using an old wooden toolbox as our toilet-paper holder and a well-worn vintage cigar box for our feminine products!”

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“A small wooden stool on top of the sleek Ikea table helps create different heights in an unexpected way. The vintage wooden clog is a charming way to display slim cuffs—although my production manager still thinks I’m crazy for buying it.”

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“These stained wooden slabs are my pride and joy. I went to the lumber store and picked out some scrap—for which the gentlemen kindly did not charge me. I spent two days staining two coats on these bad boys and couldn’t be happier with how they turned out!”

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“The metal Platner chair was one of my first purchases when I moved to Chicago in 2000. It is a personal favorite, and at least once a week someone offers to buy it. Sorry, not for sale! I purchased that rose-colored round mirror over ten years ago at Robin Richman on Damen Avenue.”

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“We removed the glass doors from this old white bookcase, which made the merchandise much more accessible to customers. The shelves on this piece are adjustable, which is key as our inventory changes.”

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“Those glass doors we removed from the white book case? There they are—hanging in the front window! They really help frame the store logo in a welcoming way.”

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“The glass cloche rests upon a vintage gear mold. I like the drama of showcasing just one single piece of jewelry under that cloche. It makes a strong statement in the front window. The painted table is another transplant from my house—it was originally purchased at A New Leaf on Wells Street in Chicago.”

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“Oh, how I love this light fixture! It is actually two half-circle topiaries wired together. This was one of the first things I purchased for the store. I just knew I had to have it. The metalwork just made too beautiful of a reference to the jewelry, and I couldn’t pass it up.”

Man, did Winnie knock it outta the park with this cuff!

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Notes

25 notes

Three Design Books That Winifred Grace Can’t Stop Flipping Through

Hear that? It’s your coffee table calling.

If a picture is worth a thousand words, Winifred Grace’s design-book collection is worth a mill. “I see something different every time I look at them,” says the Chicago jewelry genius. Take a look at the trifecta she reaches for over and over again. —alisha prakash

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House & Garden’s Complete Guide to Interior Decoration
“I have always said that if I weren’t a jewelry designer, I would be an interior designer. I share this passion with my mother, who I stole this book from several years ago. I love that the rooms are not overly designed. They are incredibly personal and really showcase who lives in these homes—there’s an eclectic mix of artwork and patterns and different influences from around the world. The book was published in 1970, but I think all of these rooms are so timeless. I guess all really good design is, right?”

image

Joseph Cornell / Marcel Duchamp…In Resonance
“This book chronicles the relationship between artists Marcel Duchamp and Joseph Cornell and celebrates their fascination with the connection between art and the found object. This book makes me want to crawl in to the pages and explore all the wonderful handwritten notes, torn newspaper scraps, old photographs, and paper packaging. The beautiful part about it is that it gives these potential pieces of trash lives of their own. It glorifies them, giving them a story and importance. It’s like going through your grandparents’ drawers filled with memories and nostalgia and realizing they had lives before you.”

image

Printed Matter / Drukwerk
“I bought this Karel Martens book while I was a graphic-design student, and it made my heart sing upon first glance. Rich with color, there is a cadence to these juicy works and how they are displayed—the chaotic business of images layered on top of one another, jammed into one small space, or the quiet respite of a clean page with a just a few examples of work. It was an awakening for me to see information displayed in such an emotive, robust way.”

Winnie made a cuff that lets your wrist show a little bit of skin.

comments, reblogs & likes

Notes

6 notes

Three Design Books That Winifred Grace Can’t Stop Flipping Through

Hear that? It’s your coffee table calling.

If a picture is worth a thousand words, Winifred Grace’s design-book collection is worth a mill. “I see something different every time I look at them,” says the Chicago jewelry genius. Take a look at the trifecta she reaches for over and over again. —alisha prakash

image

House & Garden’s Complete Guide to Interior Decoration
“I have always said that if I weren’t a jewelry designer, I would be an interior designer. I share this passion with my mother, who I stole this book from several years ago. I love that the rooms are not overly designed. They are incredibly personal and really showcase who lives in these homes—there’s an eclectic mix of artwork and patterns and different influences from around the world. The book was published in 1970, but I think all of these rooms are so timeless. I guess all really good design is, right?”

image

Joseph Cornell / Marcel Duchamp…In Resonance
“This book chronicles the relationship between artists Marcel Duchamp and Joseph Cornell and celebrates their fascination with the connection between art and the found object. This book makes me want to crawl in to the pages and explore all the wonderful handwritten notes, torn newspaper scraps, old photographs, and paper packaging. The beautiful part about it is that it gives these potential pieces of trash lives of their own. It glorifies them, giving them a story and importance. It’s like going through your grandparents’ drawers filled with memories and nostalgia and realizing they had lives before you.”

image

Printed Matter / Drukwerk
“I bought this Karel Martens book while I was a graphic-design student, and it made my heart sing upon first glance. Rich with color, there is a cadence to these juicy works and how they are displayed—the chaotic business of images layered on top of one another, jammed into one small space, or the quiet respite of a clean page with a just a few examples of work. It was an awakening for me to see information displayed in such an emotive, robust way.”

A necklace with a weaving-inspired pendant—Winifred made it happen.

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Notes

8 notes

Winifred Grace’s Style Muse: Her Grandma

Coolness most certainly runs in the family.

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Winifred Grace grew up in an art-loving family—her parents were both avid collectors—but it was her grandmother who really pushed her into the creative life. And, damn, was this is the jewelry designer’s grandma stylin’. Get a load of her look below. —raquel laneri

image“My grandmother was an artist, and she had this amazing style. I don’t want to call her a hippie—because she was more sophisticated than that—but she was a bohemian. This picture of her was a studio shot, but she actually carved those little figurines out of soap, if you can believe it.”

image“My grandmother always lived close to us, and she would come over and sit with my brother and I and make things. Please note her cool pinky ring and layered chains—it makes me happy. Because of her, I knew early on that I wanted to make a living making things and selling them.”

image“My grandmother was sort of a tomboy. She wore men’s wallabies—they’re like suede desert boots with rubber soles and sturdy laces—with brown corduroys. She had a very unique sense of style and marched to the beat of her own drummer.”

image“When her husband died when she was in her fifties, she went and lived in San Miguel, Mexico, in an artist community, where she took all sorts of classes at the art institute there. Seven or eight years ago, I went to San Miguel and took metalsmithing classes in the same exact classroom that my grandmother had taken classes. It was a very cool thing.”

image

“When I went down to Mexico to take metalsmithing classes, my mom brought this sculpture my grandmother made, which weighed, I don’t know, 75 pounds. We brought it to the art institute, and the son of the man who taught my grandma during the sculpture class made a mold of it and made copies so that I could have one and my brother could have one. I have it in my studio.”

image“This is one of my all-time favorite photos of her, sipping coffee with her kerchief on. I wore a kerchief like that for years before I ever saw this picture. Though she’s no longer living, I feel very connected to her. I channel her taste a lot—a lot of the pieces I make, I can see her wearing, which makes me really proud.”

Winifred made us a necklace her grandma would be proud of!

comments, reblogs & likes

Notes

4 notes

Winifred Grace’s Style Muse: Her Grandma

Coolness most certainly runs in the family.

image

Winifred Grace grew up in an art-loving family—her parents were both avid collectors—but it was her grandmother who really pushed her into the creative life. And, damn, was this is the jewelry designer’s grandma stylin’. Get a load of her look below. —raquel laneri

image
“My grandmother was an artist, and she had this amazing style. I don’t want to call her a hippie—because she was more sophisticated than that—but she was a bohemian. This picture of her was a studio shot, but she actually carved those little figurines out of soap, if you can believe it.”

image
“My grandmother always lived close to us, and she would come over and sit with my brother and I and make things. Please note her cool pinky ring and layered chains—it makes me happy. Because of her, I knew early on that I wanted to make a living making things and selling them.”

image
“My grandmother was sort of a tomboy. She wore men’s wallabies—they’re like suede desert boots with rubber soles and sturdy laces—with brown corduroys. She had a very unique sense of style and marched to the beat of her own drummer.”

image
“When her husband died when she was in her fifties, she went and lived in San Miguel, Mexico, in an artist community, where she took all sorts of classes at the art institute there. Seven or eight years ago, I went to San Miguel and took metalsmithing classes in the same exact classroom that my grandmother had taken classes. It was a very cool thing.”

image
“When I went down to Mexico to take metalsmithing classes, my mom brought this sculpture my grandmother made, which weighed, I don’t know, 75 pounds. We brought it to the art institute, and the son of the man who taught my grandma during the sculpture class made a mold of it and made copies so that I could have one and my brother could have one. I have it in my studio.”

image
“This is one of my all-time favorite photos of her, sipping coffee with her kerchief on. I wore a kerchief like that for years before I ever saw this picture. Though she’s no longer living, I feel very connected to her. I channel her taste a lot—a lot of the pieces I make, I can see her wearing, which makes me really proud.”

See what Winnie whipped up for you in her newest edition, now!

comments, reblogs & likes

Notes

3 notes

Three Design Books That Winifred Grace Can’t Stop Flipping Through

Hear that? It’s your coffee table calling.

If a picture is worth a thousand words, Winifred Grace’s design-book collection is worth a mill. “I see something different every time I look at them,” says the Chicago jewelry genius. Take a look at the trifecta she reaches for over and over again. —alisha prakash

image

House & Garden’s Complete Guide to Interior Decoration
“I have always said that if I weren’t a jewelry designer, I would be an interior designer. I share this passion with my mother, who I stole this book from several years ago. I love that the rooms are not overly designed. They are incredibly personal and really showcase who lives in these homes—there’s an eclectic mix of artwork and patterns and different influences from around the world. The book was published in 1970, but I think all of these rooms are so timeless. I guess all really good design is, right?”

image

Joseph Cornell / Marcel Duchamp…In Resonance
“This book chronicles the relationship between artists Marcel Duchamp and Joseph Cornell and celebrates their fascination with the connection between art and the found object. This book makes me want to crawl in to the pages and explore all the wonderful handwritten notes, torn newspaper scraps, old photographs, and paper packaging. The beautiful part about it is that it gives these potential pieces of trash lives of their own. It glorifies them, giving them a story and importance. It’s like going through your grandparents’ drawers filled with memories and nostalgia and realizing they had lives before you.”

image

Printed Matter / Drukwerk
“I bought this Karel Martens book while I was a graphic-design student, and it made my heart sing upon first glance. Rich with color, there is a cadence to these juicy works and how they are displayed—the chaotic business of images layered on top of one another, jammed into one small space, or the quiet respite of a clean page with a just a few examples of work. It was an awakening for me to see information displayed in such an emotive, robust way.”

Winifred’s newest edition is just as inspired as these printed beauties!

comments, reblogs & likes

Notes

5 notes

Winifred Grace’s Partners in Mexico

Designed in Chicago, produced in Cuernavaca.

Until very recently, Winifred Grace and her assistant made every single piece in her just-tough jewelry line themselves. The trouble? Scaling. So, when she randomly read about a workshop in Cuernavaca, Mexico, that employed local women to make bronze jewelry, she got in touch ASAP. “When I got my first set of samples from the workshop it was like Christmas: Every piece was more beautiful than I could have even imagined,” she explains. Meet the south-of-the-border members of the Winifred Grace team. —raquel laneri

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“This is Laura, the woman who founded the workshop. She is a descendant of Benjamin Franklin and President Roosevelt. She is from Arizona; her dad was in the civil service, and she traveled the world as a child. She works with a small group of local women who have never been able to earn a living for themselves, so she’s teaching them jewelry as a trade. It’s a way to empower these women so they can earn a higher income than they would working in the fields.”

image
“I design the pieces at home in Chicago and send sketches with specific measurements. We do a lot of emailing back and forth with pictures, and, once we  hone in on the details, the workshop will create and send me a physical sample. Here, one of the women is soldering one of my ring designs.”

image
“Laura tells me that these girls have become her family. The funny thing is that after I went to study metalsmithing in San Miguel, Mexico, seven years ago, I left with this burning desire to start a workshop there with the local women. Now I’ve met Laura, and she’s done that exact thing, just in a different city.”

Get Winifred’s second edition now! This Pegasus Cuff will send you soaring.

comments, reblogs & likes

Notes

1 note

Winifred Grace’s Style Muse: Her Grandma

Coolness most certainly runs in the family.

image

Winifred Grace grew up in an art-loving family—her parents were both avid collectors—but it was her grandmother who really pushed her into the creative life. And, damn, was this is the jewelry designer’s grandma stylin’. Get a load of her look below. —raquel laneri

image
“My grandmother was an artist, and she had this amazing style. I don’t want to call her a hippie—because she was more sophisticated than that—but she was a bohemian. This picture of her was a studio shot, but she actually carved those little figurines out of soap, if you can believe it.”

image
“My grandmother always lived close to us, and she would come over and sit with my brother and I and make things. Please note her cool pinky ring and layered chains—it makes me happy. Because of her, I knew early on that I wanted to make a living making things and selling them.”

image
“My grandmother was sort of a tomboy. She wore men’s wallabies—they’re like suede desert boots with rubber soles and sturdy laces—with brown corduroys. She had a very unique sense of style and marched to the beat of her own drummer.”

image
“When her husband died when she was in her fifties, she went and lived in San Miguel, Mexico, in an artist community, where she took all sorts of classes at the art institute there. Seven or eight years ago, I went to San Miguel and took metalsmithing classes in the same exact classroom that my grandmother had taken classes. It was a very cool thing.”

image
“When I went down to Mexico to take metalsmithing classes, my mom brought this sculpture my grandmother made, which weighed, I don’t know, 75 pounds. We brought it to the art institute, and the son of the man who taught my grandma during the sculpture class made a mold of it and made copies so that I could have one and my brother could have one. I have it in my studio.”

image
“This is one of my all-time favorite photos of her, sipping coffee with her kerchief on. I wore a kerchief like that for years before I ever saw this picture. Though she’s no longer living, I feel very connected to her. I channel her taste a lot—a lot of the pieces I make, I can see her wearing, which makes me really proud.”

Winifred’s second crazy-wearable edition is here! Her grandma would be way proud of her Pegasus Cuff.

comments, reblogs & likes

Notes

3 notes

Winifred Grace’s Partners in Mexico

Designed in Chicago, produced in Cuernavaca.

Until very recently, Winifred Grace and her assistant made every single piece in her just-tough jewelry line themselves. The trouble? Scaling. So, when she randomly read about a workshop in Cuernavaca, Mexico, that employed local women to make bronze jewelry, she got in touch ASAP. “When I got my first set of samples from the workshop it was like Christmas: Every piece was more beautiful than I could have even imagined,” she explains. Meet the south-of-the-border members of the Winifred Grace team. —raquel laneri

image
“This is Laura, the woman who founded the workshop. She is a descendant of Benjamin Franklin and President Roosevelt. She is from Arizona; her dad was in the civil service, and she traveled the world as a child. She works with a small group of local women who have never been able to earn a living for themselves, so she’s teaching them jewelry as a trade. It’s a way to empower these women so they can earn a higher income than they would working in the fields.”

image
“I design the pieces at home in Chicago and send sketches with specific measurements. We do a lot of emailing back and forth with pictures, and, once we  hone in on the details, the workshop will create and send me a physical sample. Here, one of the women is soldering one of my ring designs.”

image
“Laura tells me that these girls have become her family. The funny thing is that after I went to study metalsmithing in San Miguel, Mexico, seven years ago, I left with this burning desire to start a workshop there with the local women. Now I’ve met Laura, and she’s done that exact thing, just in a different city.”

Get Winifred’s edition first thing tomorrow! Click this way to make sure you don’t miss it.

comments, reblogs & likes

Notes

9 notes

Winifred Grace’s Style Muse: Her Grandma

Coolness most certainly runs in the family.

Winifred Grace grew up in an art-loving family—her parents were both avid collectors—but it was her grandmother who really pushed her into the creative life. And, damn, was this is the jewelry designer’s grandma stylin’. Get a load of her look below. —raquel laneri


“My grandmother was an artist, and she had this amazing style. I don’t want to call her a hippie—because she was more sophisticated than that—but she was a bohemian. This picture of her was a studio shot, but she actually carved those little figurines out of soap, if you can believe it.”


“My grandmother always lived close to us, and she would come over and sit with my brother and I and make things. Please note her cool pinky ring and layered chains—it makes me happy. Because of her, I knew early on that I wanted to make a living making things and selling them.”


“My grandmother was sort of a tomboy. She wore men’s wallabies—they’re like suede desert boots with rubber soles and sturdy laces—with brown corduroys. She had a very unique sense of style and marched to the beat of her own drummer.”


“When her husband died when she was in her fifties, she went and lived in San Miguel, Mexico, in an artist community, where she took all sorts of classes at the art institute there. Seven or eight years ago, I went to San Miguel and took metalsmithing classes in the same exact classroom that my grandmother had taken classes. It was a very cool thing.”


“When I went down to Mexico to take metalsmithing classes, my mom brought this sculpture my grandmother made, which weighed, I don’t know, 75 pounds. We brought it to the art institute, and the son of the man who taught my grandma during the sculpture class made a mold of it and made copies so that I could have one and my brother could have one. I have it in my studio.”


“This is one of my all-time favorite photos of her, sipping coffee with her kerchief on. I wore a kerchief like that for years before I ever saw this picture. Though she’s no longer living, I feel very connected to her. I channel her taste a lot—a lot of the pieces I make, I can see her wearing, which makes me really proud.”

Winifred’s crazy-wearable edition comes tomorrow! Make sure you don’t miss it.

comments, reblogs & likes

Notes

4 notes