Lulu Frost

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If the line Lulu Frost had a slogan, it would be “in with the old, out with the new.” Turning glimmering finds from the Titanic era into attention-grabbing earrings and stand-out necklaces worn by, well, a high percentage of Met Ball attendees, Lisa Salzer has one of those storied beginnings. After spending her childhood traipsing around her grandmother’s estate-jewelry shop, Lisa unveiled her first designs—made from repurposed Plaza Hotel room numbers—while wrapping up her art history degree at Dartmouth, she cold-called Barneys, and they bought everything.
Breathing new life into lost keys, shoe buckles, buffalo coins, and antique crystal, Lisa, who’s been at it since 2004, is now a genuine powerhouse—she has collaborated with the likes of J.Crew, Alexander Wang, and Chris Benz and has earned the sort of following that gets her work in the pages of Vogue on the reg. “It took me awhile to get my courage up to start cutting and breaking down old jewelry, honestly, because it was so precious to me,” Lisa explains. “But now, I have a different viewpoint on it. I love to make it into something fresh and new.” —carlye wisel

lulufrost.com

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Bare

Type the word bare into Google, and the images that appear may not be all beautiful bags and elegant jewelry (that’s a disclaimer, people). But that’s of no real concern to Jeet Sohal, whose line Bare—the name is an acronym for brilliant, astute, refined, and enigmatic—appeals to the type of woman who responds to things that are on the cusp of straight-up pretty and very striking.

After graduating from Dartmouth, Jeet set out to start a jewelry line, working with a friend on a boot-accessory project on the side. But when that partner hit the road with a rock-star husband, leaving Jeet with an abundance of leather, she figured, hell, why not dive into the bag realm, too? It was 2006, and she was uninspired by what she saw women carrying—you know the look: heavy on hardware, light on practicality. So she called on her grandmother, Ursula Rodriguez, who did meticulous piecework for bag companies in the Philippines, to show her the ropes. Though she found inspiration in her Indian, Filipino, and Spanish heritages, Jeet aimed to keep things clean, without the weight and showiness often found in those cultures. And the people of L.A.—where she grew up and lives now—ate up her work. Proof: Jeet now has not one but three lines—Bare Collection and Bare Bones, both jewelry-centric, and Bare Bags—to satisfy the hungry masses. —dana covit

barecollection.com

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