See All the Rad Details That Make the Veda Store the Coolest

The space might be small, but it’s stuffed with character.

Lyndsey Butler, who closed her Lower East Side shop in 2011 after the lease expired, started itching to open a new NYC store in 2013. “Our collection is very leather-heavy and outerwear-specific, but we actually do a full collection—and I felt like a store would be a great place to showcase that. I wanted people to see the other things we do—sweaters, dresses, and things like that—so I started looking for a space near the office and it just happened,” she says. Though she might have totally stumbled upon the South Soho storefront, Lyndsey was super-thoughtful about how she built it out. Check out how all of the elements came together—and then find some time to go see them in-person. —alisha prakash

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“We had the neon sign outside made. We work with a design company called Arch & Loop—they designed our logo.”

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“From the street, you can see our big sign, but when you walk up, it feels like you’re in the lobby of a normal residential building. You have to buzz in, and you have to walk through this door, which leads you to that lobby area. From there, you walk into the store. It’s one of the store’s quirks, but all part of the charm of the space. We have this little lobby area that anyone in the building can use, but we kind of took it over and redid it. We recovered the chairs in this silver fabric that I think is fun, and then there’s a cement cube side table that mirrors the floors in actual store nicely. The mannequin is a Ralph Pucci mannequin—it’s part of a series he did of Christy Turlington when she released her yoga line. She’s doing tree pose in this particular one.”

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“Here, we’re looking into the store. In the back corner, there’s a standard cash wrap. I wanted something like from the movie Shopgirl—something basic. I also wanted something that was clear, so we can do different displays in there, whether it’s a flower arrangement or a piece of ceramic. Right now, there’s a green pitcher inside, and sometimes it has plants in it.”

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“I wanted the store to feel clean and gallery-like. The walls are white, and the floors are cement—it’s a blank canvas in that way. I loved the idea of all-rug everything. It felt like a fun idea to flip that on its head and do them on the ceiling. There’s a vendor who sells rugs at the Brooklyn Flea—we went out to his warehouse, and that’s where we got a lot of them. We got a few at the ABC Home outlet in the Bronx, too. It’s such a small space, so we tried to put a personal touch anywhere we could. It’s the little things like that that make this tiny little white box feel unique and feel like us.”

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“When we moved in, there were linoleum floors that were falling apart. We tore everything up. I really wanted cement floors. They said it was too hard to do that because you have to pour one to two inches of cement, and it raises the height for everything else. I finally convinced them to do it, and it was awesome. We bought this cool piece of colored marble and laid that down first and then poured the cement around it so it has this floating-island-of-marble effect. This is one of the displays we have in the store—it’s a gradated, mirrored podium. On top is a clutch made of leftover remnants from the rug for the ceiling.”

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“We got these wall plants from the Union Square Greenmarket. I wanted to bring something live into the space. We have a guy who comes in a couple of times a month and makes sure they’re doing well, and if one of them needs to be replaced or replanted, he helps us maintain that. He makes sure all of them are very happy.”

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“The clothing racks are these clear, lucite, open kind-of-cubes. We had them custom-made. They are extremely heavy and cannot be moved and are really fragile, but I love them. They feel like they’re floating in a fun way.”

To see all this awesomeness IRL, head to the Veda store at 19 Mercer St. in NYC.

This Veda jacket needs to be in your life right this second.

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South Soho’s One of NYC’s Coolest ‘Hoods—Let Lyndsey Butler Show You Around

Where to eat, shop, and get your hair dyed blue.

“While traditional Soho has big-box stores—the Zaras and H&Ms—South Soho has a lot of new, up-and-coming things. I like that there are a lot of young creatives working in the neighborhood,” says Lyndsey Butler of the cultish leather line Veda. And she should know: She set up shop there and also lives nearby, right around the bend in Chinatown. Here, seven reasons why she’s so bullish on the ‘hood. —alisha prakash

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101 Spring Street
Donald Judd’s studio-slash-home has finally been restored and reopened as part of his foundation. You have to book a time to go see it. I’m from Texas, and Donald Judd also has a big foundation there and lived in Marfa—that’s how the whole art scene got started there. Everything he did was so specific—he was really focused on space and light, and so his Soho loft has furniture that he designed that works perfectly for that space.”
(101 Spring St.)

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Antifurniture
“Antifurniture is by this guy, Nelson, who has a great collection of used art books, zines, and other printed material like old magazines—mostly from the seventies, eighties, and nineties. He has this great archive of imagery that he sets up on the street and sells when it’s nice out.  He’s going to curate a little collection for the store—we’re going to pick things that are in-line with Veda, so punk zines, motorcycle magazines, and stuff like that.”
(Howard St. and Broadway)

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Acne Studios
“I love the Acne Studios store. It’s weird and cool, and they make great basics with a little bit of flair. I love their denim, T-shirts, and sweaters. I like to go in there and see what they’re doing. They usually have cool collaborations and artwork, and they change their displays often.”
(33 Greene St.)

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Suite Caroline
“I’ve been seeing Lena Ott at Suite Caroline for probably three or four years. She’s an amazing colorist–she does all the models and Scarlett Johansson. She just opened this salon not that long ago on Greene Street. It’s designed so well, and the team is awesome. My hair has been blue for the last year or so. I did it myself at first, but she touches it up for me. We have a lot of fun with it. She is honest and is an artist. She knows what’s going to look good color-wise.”
(65 Greene St., 2nd Fl.)

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Smile to Go
“Smile to Go’s coffee is great. If you want to get lunch there, go by noon because they sell out of a lot of the stuff. If you miss lunch, they have coffee all day long, and their cookies are to-die-for. They have a dark chocolate chip with sea salt that’s crazy-good.”
(22 Howard St.)

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Team Gallery
“Ryan McGinley has a show there that looks really awesome. The gallery doesn’t just represent photographers but a mix of up-and-coming and established artists.”
(83 Grand St.)

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BDDW
“BDDW is very pricey, but it’s beautiful. Their furniture is amazing, but their space is worth it just to go inside. There are these tall, arched ceilings, and their furniture is all handmade—it’s a cool mix of Americana heritage with modern details. I’m not doing it justice, but it’s really beautiful.”
(5 Crosby St.)

This Veda jacket is ready to hang in the coolest neighborhoods.

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Kylie Nakao’s 3 Very Favorite Beaches Near NYC

Um, she even hits the waves before she starts her day.

When Kylie Nakao isn’t working on her super-fly stackable jewelry line Tarin Thomas, she’s in the sand—a habit she picked up when she moved from Canada to New York in 2009. “Whenever I’m there, the weekend feels like it’s 10 days long,” she says. “The bustle of the city disappears, and you feel like you’re in a completely different world.” Three beaches under three hours from NYC? Right this way. —genevieve ang

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Rockaway Beach
This is the closest beach to the city, and you can take the ferry or train there. We’ll go in the morning before work at 4 A.M.—I’m not so diehard, but my boyfriend will surf while I chill on the beach. It’s not the prettiest beach—there’s always garbage floating around!—but it’s only a 45-minute ride from downtown, so I can’t really complain.

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The Must-Do: Eat at Rockaway Taco. Everyone talks about it, but it’s definitely one of our favorite places to go to. It’s been there since the very beginning—and made it through Sandy and the crazy storm.

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Fire Island
We’ll take the train out sometimes on the weekend. It’s a cool little island—and no cars are allowed on it—so there’s a great beach-town vibe. It’s where I first learned to surf, but you can also paddle board and do tons of beach activities.

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The Must-Do: Picnic on the beach. We have this great thing called the MULE that is basically a set of wheels for your surfboard. We prepare a picnic and drag all our gear on this to the beach—there aren’t a ton of restaurants on the island except in the little towns, so you really go there for the water.

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Ditch Plains Beach in Montauk
This is where I’ve been spending most of my time because my friend recently bought a place here. This is the first summer where I’ve really started to pick up surfing, and this is the perfect beach to learn. It has a totally different vibe because it’s full of younger people who’ve trekked out three hours from the city to get to the beach.

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The Must-Do: Hang out at Surf Lodge. They do live concerts—around three or four each weekend. We canoe over and listen from the pond. They hold the most amazing sunset parties, and it’s a good way to wind down from the day and have a couple of cocktails.

You don’t wanna miss Kylie’s topaz edition—it’s major.

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Christine Alcalay Flaunts her Garment District Pride

Um, she’s known the owner of her factory since her teen years.

New York City’s Garment District is practically Christine Alcalay’s second home—the designer of breezy, sophisticated clothing has been hanging around the ‘hood since her grade-school days when her mom worked in factories there. Over the last two decades, she’s watched the once-hopping Midtown district shrink to a ten-block area, but that’s just made her more loyal—and proud that her line’s produced there. Get the scoop on why it means so much to her. —nicole loher

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“When I was 13, my mom worked for a designer, and I met the owner of the garment factory I work with now, Mei. It’s been about six years that I’ve been working with her. She’s been a great support, and I love seeing her grow as my business grows, too.”

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“The space is large enough for me to go through the fabrics and make sure I have all the things I need such as zippers, labels, and specs of the completed garment.”

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“These mounds of fabric go from station to station to be completed. Each sewer works on one part of the garment.”

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“Mr. Lin corrects and organizes all of the patters and gets them ready to be cut.”

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“After the patterns have been cut, they are rolled up by size and color and ready for the sewers.”

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“After the garments have been sewn by machine, the hand-sewing needs to be completed. Here, labels, snaps, buttons, and finishes are done.”

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“Pressing the garment may be one of the most important parts of the process—to give it that final finish.”

See Christine’s beyond beautiful final product now! 

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Head to the Valley of Ashes With Chen Chen and Kai Williams

Talk about an unlikely spot for inspiration.

All right, time to bust out your high-school copy of The Great Gatsby (or your Baz Luhrman DVD, no judgments), because that mythological Valley of Ashes? It’s a real place. In Queens. Chen Chen and Kai Williams, the guys behind the home-and-accessories line of the same name, sometimes make the trip to the spot—officially called Willet’s Point—to get a little perspective. “It’s crazy,” says Chen. “It’s seriously like a third-world country out there.” Go on a tour with him and see just what he means. —jane-claire quigley

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“We discovered this neighborhood when we had our old van taken to a junkyard there, and we were immediately drawn to it. I think our underlying interest in Willet’s Point is that everyone there is making the best possible solutions to deal with scarcity of capital. There’s the right way to do something, and then there are ways that make do with what’s available. That thought process exists in all of our work.

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“You find all sorts of ad-hoc solutions people create out of necessity. Once we saw a man in a Dodge Caravan, side door open, with a shoe display inside, slowly cruising down the street, calling out to potential customers.”

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“This image of the Cadillac in the mud is a common sight. The neighborhood isn’t hooked up to the plumbing system, so when it rains, these giant puddles form in the once-paved street. Each giant pothole becomes a small pond.”

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“In general, I think it’s surprising for most people to find that a place like this exists in New York City, especially under the shadow of the brand-new Citi Field. Fitzgerald called it a Valley of Ashes, but at its very basic level, Willet’s Point is about being able to imbue something with value using your abilities. That’s pretty inspiring.”

These two made the prettiest cement planters we’ve ever seen.

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Step Inside Mimi Eayrs’s Cozy Clinton Hill Apartment

Stay as long as you want.

“The space is like a Tetris game,” says Mimi Eayrs—who designs the bangin’ bag line Earyslee with Joanne Lee—of her Brooklyn pad. “We have optimized every corner for storage—we had to make sure we could squeeze everything in a way that doesn’t seem too cluttered.” See how she, her husband Jason, and their son Indigo have done a lot with a little space. —alisha prakash

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“This is our living room. My husband made the coffee table many years ago. The blue book on it was a gift he gave to our son on the day that he was born. It is called Conversations with Blueour son’s name is Indigo—and has the most beautiful, delicate prints made with cyanotype. Basically, the whole apartment is a juxtaposition of both our styles. Jason is a little more modern and likes cleaner lines. I tend to be drawn to more vintage stuff, like the mirror above the mantle.”

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“This picture was given to us by my best friend in Argentina for our wedding. It’s from an artist named Nahuel Vecino. We call it our auspicious painting.”

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“We love vinyl. The record that is on—by Father John Misty—is what our son listened to while he was in the womb. When he was just a couple of weeks old, this was one of the few things that would really soothe him and put him to sleep. To the left is the Eayrslee Lou iPad bag and the Cooper mini bag in stingray. The painting is one of mine.”

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“My husband made the four moons painting last year while I was in Brazil for business. He had never painted anything before and decided to try something out—which ended up looking pretty awesome.”

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“My grandmother brought that little table with her all the way from Argentina, though it originally came from India. The photograph was a Polaroid our friend took at our wedding that he then blew up and gave to us. And that’s an Eayrslee yellow Henry wallet on the side table.”

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“This used to be the Eayrslee office. Joanne and I always referred to Eayrslee as our baby…until the actual baby I had with my husband came along, and the space became his room. The curtain came from India; the rug we found in the north of Argentina, after searching for days. We picked the color for the walls before we found out the gender of the baby—it was a unanimous decision.”

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“The little bunny was handmade in Argentina, and the rattle was a gift from our good friend. Whenever we’re changing Indi and he starts to cry, I say ‘magic!’ and shake the rattle, which makes the sound, that in my mind, they would use for a magic moment if our lives had a soundtrack. Indi loves it and becomes completely absorbed by it.”

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“The painting on the left was a gift to Indi from his godmother in Argentina. It’s pretty crazy because it looks just like me, and it reminds me of how I would have drawn myself. We love it. The llamas come from a little town called Purmamarca in the north of Argentina, and the little drawing on the right is a mini Yves Klein that we printed on a regular old printer.”

Check out the rad leather clutch Mimi and Joanne made for us here!

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Why Danielle Ribner is All About Made-in-America

From fabric to factories.

“I started out with local factories because I was so small—overseas factories wouldn’t work on my orders,” explains Danielle Ribner of her label Loup. “But now I’m so glad I decided to stay local.” Read on to see how keeping everything close has shaped her line of snuggly sweatshirt dresses, flannel midi skirts, and bold moto jackets. —genevieve ang

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Get a load of this coziness.

Sourcing Some Fly Fabric
“Most of the fabrics that I use are made in California and the Midwest by people who have been making fabric for decades. These factories typically make all-purpose work wear materials, like microsuede, canvas, and denim. What I do is treat the fabrics to make them softer and also find different ways to use them.”

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Denim, before and after a special Loup wash.

Treating the Fabric Locally
“When I get heavier, thicker fabrics, I want to rework them to make them a little softer. I’ve worked with my washers in New York for a long time. They’ve been doing this forever and have some really great ideas. It’s true collaboration—I come up with these crazy new ideas, and they give their input and find ways to make them work. I think we really make something special because we combine our knowledge.”

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Jasmine, a seamstress, working on a Loup dress in New York City’s Garment District.

Manufacturing Right in the Garment District
“I really enjoy using local factories. I can easily walk over to my factory if there’s a problem, and I can be really hands-on. I know every person who’s sewing the garments and making the fabric. It’s also a lot more conducive to the way that fashion works now—I can have a new product in three weeks! Loup has used almost all the same factories since the beginning—they know me very well, for sure.”

Don’t miss Danielle’s American-made maroon dress—you won’t want to take it off!

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Hang With the Two Buddies Behind Ivory Row

You’ll want to be their third wheel.

Grace Chang and Pierre Kim, the masterminds behind the made-for-snuggling knitwear line Ivory Row, were pals for nearly a decade before they ever became business partners-in-crime. And the transition has gone, well, swimmingly. “I’m the older brother she never had, and she’s the younger sister I never had,” says Pierre. “We’re both very left-brain, right-brain people. We can discuss seasonal trends, analyze e-commerce metrics, review color swatches and finances—all in the same conversation.” Ok, but what’s it really like to work with a friend? Get the DL on the duo’s on- and off-duty relationship. —alisha prakash

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Pierre:“I have a very rare genetic disease that prevents me from smiling naturally whenever a camera is pointed in my direction. It’s sad but true. Here, Grace is politely telling me that if I insist on leaving my sunglasses on for another photo, at the very least, I have to try to smile. If not, she’s going to rip them off my head, break off one of my fingers, and feed it to the pigeons.”

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Pierre:“This is Grace’s desk in our Tribeca office. This desk also serves as our de facto conference table and communal meal table. We both greatly enjoy food, so we try to schedule as many meetings as possible over lunch. We both share a similar philosophy that life’s too short to work with people you don’t like. So far, it’s worked out great.”

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Grace:“Pierre has three daughters and is always completely surrounded by females. However, every once in awhile, he needs some guy time. Thankfully, he has my son Odin. He’s his little buddy. Here, he is surfing on Pierre’s leg as he gives him lectures on how to navigate around females. It’s really never too early to learn, is it?”

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Grace:“For the kids, Halloween is like Christmas, but with costumes. It is, by far, their favorite holiday of the year. The kids really enjoy coming to my (Aunt Grace’s!) annual Halloween party—replete with homemade spider cupcakes and monster slime Jell-O. Here I am with Pierre’s two youngest kids. The six-year-old is the bride of Chucky, the 9-year-old is pre-teen vampire, and I am in my Dia de los Muertos outfit.”

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Pierre:“This is our Serious Asian Fashion Designers (SAFD™) pose. We’ve spent years practicing this pose, knowing that one day in the future, it would be useful when we were asked by someone to submit photos for a future cashmere company that we were going to launch. Sure, it was awkward at parties, and a lot of times, people would approach and ask us, ‘What the heck are you guys doing?’ But who’s having the last laugh now? Just kidding. This is actually us outside Le Pain Quotidien. It’s basically our second office. The one thing that you don’t learn in business school is that launching an e-commerce start-up requires an enormous amount of caffeine and baked goods. Many years from now, I will still associate the months prior to our launch with the smell of freshly made croissants. Le Pain Quotidien is practically our silent partner.”

These buddies made the coziest sweater for their new edition—check it out! 

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See How Pierre Kim and Grace Chang Are Staying Toasty

Ten ways to keep cozy, beyond those weird hand-warmer situations.

Grace Chang and Pierre Kim know a thing or two about beating the chill—the duo’s responsible for a line of impossibly plush, super-good-looking sweaters called Ivory Row. So, beyond piling on the layers, how do these buddies-turned-business partners deal when the weather outside if frightful? Here, they each share five things that give them the warm fuzzies. —alisha prakash

Pierre’s Picks:

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“I’m a huge fan of savory winter soups and stews. As soon as the temperature drops, we’ll find ourselves in the kitchen cooking up a new batch of soup every weekend. Family favorites include carrot-ginger, spicy beef chili, and kale with roasted vegetables.”

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“See these three cute little urchins? These are my daughters (and yes, I live with four females.) They’re an amazing, fun, and fearless group of girls. Nothing beats those cold nights where the five of us cuddle up together under a blanket and have family movie night. We’ll make popcorn, roasted chestnuts, and hot apple cider. Nothing in the world makes me happier.”

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“For us, a big part of winter is catching up on all the new plays that have opened for the season—my fiancée’s father is a well-known playwright in Ireland, and we both grew up as children seeing a lot of theater. We’ll see everything from small downtown productions to major Broadway events. We share a mutual dislike of musicals, though.”

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“There’s something about the proper mix of bourbon, sugar, bitters, and muddled fruit that makes the Old-Fashioned a perfect winter cocktail. The best ones are served at NYC stalwarts like 21 Club or Bemelmans.”

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“I’m an avid reader, and my night table is overflowing with books. This is what it looks like now. We live near NYC’s best independent bookstore, McNally Jackson, and we try to support them as much as we can. When it gets cold out, we’ll often head over there after dinner for an hour or so—everyone in the family gets to choose a book.”

Grace’s Picks:

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“Nothing like communal soup to get you going during the winter. I love Chinese-style hot pot where you throw thinly sliced meat, vegetables, and seafood into a boiling pot of water and dip into sauce. It’s a hearty meal and a bonding experience. The best hot pot in New York City can be found at Shabu-Tatsu on 10th Street and 2nd Avenue. It’s an old-school location that has a devoutly loyal clientele. I’ve seen Molly Ringwald and Paulina Porizkova wait in line for an hour out on the street just to get in.”

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“The Christmas market in Germany—this is how you do Christmas. Hand-made ornaments and treats are sold at every vendor. You can take break from shopping and get Glühwein (a spicy, warm wine) and bratwurst.”

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“A Moscow Mule—made with vodka, ginger beer, and lime—gives you a great buzz and keeps the winter cold away! Win-win.”

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Knitting is an expensive hobby if you do it in New York, but I love knitting in the winter. My favorite store is Purl in Soho. I never come out of there without something in my hand.”

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“’I’ve always loved Christmas, but Christmas is a different holiday when you have kids involved. We get all the kids together and have crazy present-opening sessions a day before.”

These two made a sweater that will keep you staying warm and cozy all through the winter.

 

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Oldies but Goodies: 29 of the Best Vintage Stores EVER—According to the Designers Who Shop Them

Looking for a worn-in Wrangler jacket? A super-fly seventies Halston dress? Then you’re going to want to keep reading. —erica

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Some dope shoes from Marmalade Vintage.

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About Glamour, Williamsburg
Tara St James of Study: “I am really hesitant about submitting this because I feel like I’m giving up a best-kept secret, but here goes: My favorite vintage shop, by far, is About Glamour.  It is the best place to find nearly new and vintage Japanese designers for great prices—including Yohji, Comme des Garçons, Zucca—as well as a lot of Vivienne Westwood. But shhhh!”

CJS Sales, Garment District
Stacy Herzog of frieda&nellie: “It is like going on a crazy treasure hunt for vintage jewels. You have to swim and dig through boxes and piles of inventory. The signed, rare, crystal wowzer pieces I have found make it well worth the hunt. It is unlike any vintage store, flea market, or warehouse I have ever been to.”

Fox & Fawn, Greenpoint and Bushwick
Sara Gates of Cook & Gates: “My absolute favorite vintage source is Fox & Fawn. Best of all is you can buy items directly off their Instagram feed. Call the store and get your payment info on file—then all you have to do is be the first to write ‘ring me up’ and your last name on any item you see, and it’s yours. Sheer brilliance!”

Grand Street Bakery, Williamsburg
Sarah Frances Kuhn of SFK: “They have an amazing selection of denim, vinyl, and jewelry. Plus they have great live shows in the back—my band played there!”

Marmalade Vintage, Little Italy
Ann Yee: “They have stand-out pieces and a great mix of designers. I’m always so inspired because of the abundance in texture, color, and pattern. I feel like I’m walking into a collage.”

No Relation Vintage, East Village
Collette Ishiyama: “This is a tough one, as I love a good treasure hunt and have many favorite spots in NYC No Relation Vintage in the East Village is pretty great. You really have to dig, but I found a camel Burberry trench there a few years ago for about $50.”

Pin Up Queens, Astoria
Lindsey Lambillotte of Lambillotte: “They have a ton of cool jewelry—very unique finds. They also have awesome furs.”

Stella Dallas, Williamsburg
Nikki Chasin: “The home store is great for textiles, and the clothing store is amazing, especially for old athletic and military garb. The last time I was there, they had a bulletproof vest!”
Andrew Spargo of GREI.: “We go there often when getting started each season. Many times I’ll buy fabric and indigo-dye it for personal pieces.”
Larry Paul of GREI.: “It’s also the bandana mother lode. They usually have a couple bins full of assorted colors—most are fairly common, but if you dig hard enough, there are rare finds.”

Yesterday’s News, Carroll Gardens
Annika Jermyn of mrs.Jermyn: “They get furniture from old brownstones around Brooklyn mostly. I pass this store every day on my way to the studio and often check out their treasures just for inspiration, even if I’m not buying anything.”

imageThe Sweet As… space—stunning, right?!

L.A.

Animal House, Venice
Sophie Monet Okulick of Sophie Monet: “I’ve been shopping at Animal House since I was 13. I love the tiki bar-meets-rock band hangout vibe. The owner collects vintage Pucci and skateboards from the sixties. You can always find a killer vintage tee and perfectly distressed jean jacket among the racks.”

Driftwood, Echo Park
Melissa Coker of Wren: “Does my grandmother’s closet count? If no, Driftwood—I love it because they have an amazingly well-edited selection, and their prices are GREAT.”

Golyester, Hollywood
Jeet Sohal of Bare: “I always find something that I absolutely cannot live without be it a fifties tulle gown, an Irish linen blouse, a French twenties cropped cardigan, or a Greek metalwork belt.”

Rose Bowl Flea Market, Pasadena
Tere Artigas of Gabriela Artigas: “I’m not into vintage clothing, but I love vintage furniture and antiques! Her, you can find Danish pottery, California design, and mid-century furniture in impeccable. It’s just great!”

Sweet As… Vintage, Echo Park
Clare Vivier: “I always find the best dresses here. They have a great eye and a wonderfully curated selection. They are also the some of the nicest ladies around!”

The Window, Hollywood
Kathleen Whitaker: “Beautiful aesthetic and collection of furniture, objects, and jewelry from all periods—all rare and in superb condition.”

imageThe perfect suede bomber, c/o Where I Was From.

ELSEWHERE

Amvets Thrift Store, San Diego, California
Emily Sugihara of Baggu: “It’s dirt cheap with no curation—so it’s only recommended for those who love the search.”

Bon Ton Vintage, Forreston, Texas
Kathryn Fortunato of Lizzie Fortunato: “Easy: Bon Ton Vintage on the lone road between Austin and Dallas. Amazing finds for cheap.”

Brimfield Antique Show, Brimfield, Massachusetts
Jaclyn Mayer of Orly Genger by Jaclyn Mayer: “My favorite spot is probably Brimfield because you can wander for hours and never know what you’re going to find.”

Captain Betty’s, Delaware, Ohio
Allison Sires of Thomas Sires: “I grew up in Columbus, which is nearby, so my friends and I started going to Betty’s when we were in high school. When I’m back home, I still make a trip to check out what’s there. As one Yelp reviewer put it, ‘Captain Betty’s personality complements her eclectic collection of vintage clothing.’ If you’ve met Betty, you know what he’s talking about—which is a reason in itself to visit the shop.”

Colorado—like, the whole state
Isabel Halley: “My most favorite vintage sources are thrift stores in Colorado. The entire state is filled with an incredible range from cheap Salvation Armies outside of Denver that have stellar, perfectly worn denim to incredibly well-priced consignment stores in Aspen.”

Feathers Boutique, Austin, Texas
Lauren Wood of Wax + Cruz: “For the Southern rocker chick in me, lots of fringe and Indian hippie dresses.”

Happy Dragon Thrift Shop, Los Gatos, California
Lina Rennell: “For brick-and-mortar, Happy Dragon in my childhood town of Los Gatos. It’s all donation-based, and you never know what you’ll find.”

My Sisters’ Closet, St. Paul, Minnesota
Jennie Engelhardt of Hare+Hart: “Living in New York, I have a plethora of great vintage stores within walking distance from my apartment, but my favorite is still over 1000 miles away in my home state of Minnesota.  My mom and I discovered My Sisters’ Closet while driving down Grand Avenue in St. Paul on our way to get homemade chocolate from Just Truffles (another great Minnesota find).  The store is a mix of vintage and consignment, and the owner does such a good job curating it that I never walk away without something really unique and special. I’ve found so many amazing pieces there—including a collarless eighties Chanel blazer for $145 that has become my staple jacket this fall.”

Orbuni wao-woo, Twi, Accra, Ghana
Maryanne Mathias of Osei-Duro: “The Accra bend-down, or ‘Orbuni wao-woo’— which means ‘dead white-man’s market’ in Twi. There are tons of bales of vintage castaways from England, Canada, and Korea. You can find piles of brightly printed gathered skirts, or amazingly worn Korean printed undershirts.”

Ragtag, Tokyo, Japan
Christine Marcelino of Materials + Process: “I don’t shop vintage much, but I did go to great spots in Japan. My favorite was called Ragtag in Harajuku. It has a great assortment of streetwear, formalwear, and designer labels. All the products are in amazing condition.”

Savers, Providence, Rhode Island
Lia Cinquegrano of Thomas IV: “I went to RISD and became very attached to shopping at Savers! It’s like the T.J.Maxx of Goodwills!”

Slash, Berkeley, California
Ellen Van Der Laan of Baggu: “I get the feeling this is a mecca to anyone in the Bay Area, but having just moved here from Brooklyn, it’s pretty mind-blowing.”

Thanx God I’m a V.I.P., Paris, France
Hillary Taymour of Collina Strada: “I go here every time I’m in town. Their vintage YSL collection is remarkable. I’ve gotten amazing, lifelong pieces here, such as Jean Paul Gaultier silk pajamas and floral-print Dries van Noten dress pants.”

Where I Was From, Online!
Emily Sugihara of Baggu: “Claire is a friend and has AMAZING taste. I can reliably find something I love there.”
Ellen Van Der Laan of Baggu: “Their taste is totally WOWEE ZOWEE!”

Looking for more vintage goodness? Here you go!

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