Go Quilt Crazy With A Question of Eagles

Don’t you wanna cozy up with one of these, like, now?!

When Jonathan Ballak and Melissa Tolar of A Question of Eagles say their work is a family affair, they are not messing around. The L.A.-based duo’s married, and when they’re not working on their pottery, they’re calling on their other collaborator, Melissa’s mom, Marcia Tolar. She crafts quilts—and freaking cool ones at that—for the line from her home in Chicago. Get a load of them below. —jane gauger

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“We knew when we started our business that we wanted to include other objects for the home and not have it be about just one thing—quilts are a creative extension of what we do with pottery. My mom had been quilting for a long time, so she got on board to make the quilts—she cuts the pieces, sews them together, and hand-sews the edges. She’s a part of the design process as well.”

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“We want the quilts to have an heirloom quality, but we wanted to use brighter, contemporary colors and to modernize the look of quilts with geometric shapes.”

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“These are lap quilts, so they are a little bit smaller than regular quilts. But they are still pretty labor-intensive.”

See what else this duo can make—their ceramic edition is one you won’t want to miss!

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Of a Kind

Yowzers, Hopewell's quilts would motivate me to make my bed. Which would be some real progress, that's for sure. —erica

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Get Quilt-Happy with Chiyome

Girl is scrappy.

In addition to streamlined bags, Anna Lynett Moss is way into quilting and sells her creations under her so-good, so-sleek label, Chiyome. How’d she fall into this work? “Today, our will to piece together a blanket with scraps of old garments is deflated by the convenience of cheap commercial alternatives,” explains Anna in her always-thoughtful way. “I’m interested in the luxurious opportunity to manipulate this craft by choice and not necessity.” Get a taste of her inspo and work. —carly pifer


“When I was moving from L.A. to NYC last year, I couldn’t justify bringing my box of weird fabric straps with me. So I sewed them into my first quilt and by changing their context, elevated their value. Today, quilt-making exists in this tenuous space between pragmatism and luxury. It is at once utilitarian and celebratory. I’m not interested so much in the nostalgia of the fabrics as I am in this ritual of the handmade. It’s a very powerful act to make something from a few basic elements.”


“To me, making quilts is familiar because of the formal matrix and the distance between maker and form. It’s the same in printmaking, which I studied at RISD. The process is just negotiating within a set of rules—there is freedom in that structure. I was looking at Bauhaus textiles like this one when I developed my quilt series.”


“This series was kind of a visceral exercise in the push-pull of form. I would start by considering the whole size of the piece and sprinkle in a few layers of color, then build forward or backward on the quilt-plane until the form started to emerge. I admire the color restraint in the work of Anni Albers. She did ink drawings in preparation for textiles like this one.”


“I love how quilts have this specific place in American history that is occupied today by advocates for extreme craftsmanship. There’s a real method to it. My quilts are a little irreverent, to be honest, because they don’t adhere to these ingrained historical standards of structure and stitch. They are intended to be wall pieces, and I approached the process of making them like I would a painting or print.”

Anna’s edition is coming first thing in the AM! Get on our email list so you can scoop it up.

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