The Vacationers: Erica’s Guide to Having, Like, the BEST Time in Portugal

You guys, I just recently got back from a two-week-long honeymoon in Portugal. And while I recommend honeymoons in general, I endorse this one in particular because Portugal, you see, is awesome. It’s got history and good design, beaches and vineyards—and it’s pretty dang affordable, too. You should probably go (and don’t feel like you have to get married to do so). If/when you make the trip: Rent a car and plan some time outside of the bigger cities. My thoughts on where you should head and what you should do, see, eat, and buy there below. —erica

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Impossible to get enough of those tiles.

PORTO

What It Is: The country’s second-largest city is also one of the oldest in Europe.

Where to Stay: One of eight polished apartments at Flattered in Foz, an oceanfront ‘hood that’s a little removed—in a good way—from the more touristy part of town.

What to Eat: Lunch at Mercearia Das Flores, a chill little spot with lots of regional products that resides on a cute stretch of Rua das Flores.

What to Do: Walk up and down all of the windy little streets in  Ribeira and Clérigos.

What to Bring Home: Port—duuuuuh. We fell especially hard for RP10, an aged tawny from Ramos Pinto, and the dry white take from Dow’s.

A Good Planning Resource: The app version of the Wallpaper* City Guide to Porto.

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Pool time at Villa Extramuros.

ARRAIOLOS

What It Is: A teeny town in the up-and-coming wine region Alentejo—super-pretty with all its cork and olive trees.

Where to Stay: Villa Extramuros, which is kind of like a design-oriented B&B…with a sick little pool and some sheep grazing on the property. (I named one of the ewes Stacy—if you meet her, tell her I say hey.)

What to Eat: An outdoor lunch at the couldn’t-be-more-stunning vineyard Herdade do Esporão. You’ll obviously need to do a tasting of their house olive oils.

What to Do: Explore Évora, the medieval town about 20 minutes away—and definitely stop in for a meal at Botequim da Mouraria while you’re around.

What to Bring Home: A rug from Casa dos Tapetes. They’ve been the Arraiolos specialty since the 17th Century.

A Good Planning Resource: This Saveur story about the area’s food traditions, by a writer who’s been visiting since the sixties.

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Downtown Comporta—that’s a juice bar there on the right.

COMPORTA

What It Is: A beach destination amidst rice fields that’s about 75 miles south of Lisbon—in my imagination, it’s like the Hamptons 20 years ago: You can tell it’s headed in a scene-y direction, but it’s not there yet.

Where to Stay: This freaking adorable beach house (comes with a hammock, obviously) or a room at this sleek-looking hotel-spa thing Sublime that just opened.

What to Eat: Some ultra-fresh grilled fish and the fava bean salad at the beachside restaurant Sal.

What to Do: Score a stretch of sand and laze the day away at glorious, crowd-free Praia do Pego.

What to Bring Home: Some ceramics from the appealingly fancy-pants Loja do Museu do Arroz.

A Good Planning Resource: Condé Nast Traveller has the scoop.

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Breakfast at Baixa House! I know: those plates.

LISBON

What It Is: The place you were already planning to visit if you were thinking about heading to Portugal.

Where to Stay: A Baixa House apartment that’s decorated perfectly and situated right in the thick of things.

What to Eat: A blowout, many-course dinner at 100 Maneiras…or a low-key, vinho verde-and-cheese snack at the teeny, totally unassuming Graça do Vinho.

What to Do: Check out the Museu Nacional do Azulejo, the national tile museum, and definitely grab a drink in the courtyard after you do. (Not sure if it’s clear yet, but: There’s a lot of day-drinking to be had.)

What to Bring Home: Canned fish—if you ask me, both Conserveira de Lisboa and Loja das Conservas are worth a visit.

A Good Planning Resource: This tribute to the city c/o Frank Bruni.

Looking for more trip ideas? Welp, here you go.

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The Insider: Pavia Rosati

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Pavia Rosati claims she was born with the travel bug, and she can back that up: She took her first trip to Italy when she was, um, nine months old. These days, she puts her globetrotting skills to very good use: She is the founder of Fathom, the site we check for tips on how to make the most of a few days in Stockholm, where to find Maui’s best street food, and everything in between. Get some trip-taking insights from the so-savvy woman herself below. —mattie kahn

Q: What are your go-to plane snacks?
A: I always cook for flights. I roast chickpeas, which are my favorite food. And then I fill a Ziploc with slices of red pepper and cucumber and carrots. I take plane snacks very seriously.

Q: Bet you have some exciting trips planned for this summer. Where are you headed?
A: Every year I go to the Amalfi coast. I have a standing trip around Fourth of July. But the thing about how I travel is I rarely know where I’m going a month ahead of time. In the last six weeks, I’ve been to London, Amsterdam, Vegas, and Rio. But twelve weeks ago, I didn’t really know I was going to any of those places. I’m a super-spontaneous traveler.

Q: So, how many languages do you speak?
A: In order of fluency: English, Italian, French, Spanish, and Portuguese. I try to learn a few phrases in every language. I like to know the important ones, like “Thank you,” “Please,” “How are you?”—I have those in Arabic and German. But smiling goes a long way.

Q: What websites do you check first thing in the AM?
A: I read the New York Times. I get a lot of my news digests via email. I subscribe to GigaOM, Skift, Business Insider. I think Business Insider is the Us Weekly of the tech world, but I can’t stop.

Q: Say you’re looking to max out your credit cards. Where would you go?  
A: The Connaught hotel in London and Amanwella in Sri Lanka. The Connaught is just a magical place where everyone is kind and perfect and the décor is beautiful. It’s just heavenly. And the Aman Resort mixes taking great care of you and leaving you completely alone beautifully. It’s the definition of vacation. The food is always delicious, the setting is always breathtaking, and the people there never bother you with the things you don’t want to think about on holiday.

Q: What do you miss most when you’re away from home?
A: I miss my coffeepot a lot. Sometimes I miss being able to cook for myself. I love eating out, obviously, but when you’re on week three of having no control over your own food, it gets a little tough. I really love my bed. But, frankly, I like going away—because then I get excited about these things when I come home.

Meet more seriously impressive people right over here.

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Get Outta Here: 36 Sick Hotels and Vacation Rentals That Designers Swear By

Are you starting to plan-slash-dream about a summer getaway? Well, then, you best consult this list: We’ve asked some aesthetically minded, inspiration-hungry, overworked designers where they check-in when they can slip away for a few days, and they’ve shared three dozen spots—from boutique hotels in Dubai to beach huts in Tulum to rustic cabins in Utah—that are nothing short of mind-blowing. —erica

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Abode Hotel
Mumbai, India 
“It’s such a beautiful and calming haven, and I am addicted to their watermelon juice at breakfast. They also have Marmite, which I have a weakness for.” —Nina Egli of Toujours Toi Family Affairs

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Amanyara
Turks and Caicos, British West Indies
“Luxurious, with incredible food. Imagine your own private cinema—and popcorn—at any time of the day.” —Erin Wahed of Bande des Quatres

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Ananda Spa
Narendranagar, India
“We went to the Ananda Spa high up in the Himalayas of India at the end of our month-long sisters trip. After a constant, hectic hustle for three weeks seeing as much as we could in Nepal and Rajasthan, we arrived at the Ananda in a state of sensory overload. The hotel is perched in the heaven of super-fresh and crisp air, it’s lush and luxurious, and the Ayurvedic spa is top-notch. Our favorite part of our stay was probably the Kurta pajamas all guests wear at the hotel.” —Amanda and Melanie Kain of Kain Label

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Arizona Biltmore
Phoenix, Arizona
“It opened 1929 and was designed by Albert Chase McArthur with Frank Lloyd Wright. It feels so Mayan—that’s what I love about it. It’s so luxurious, and I also loved their garden—it looks a little bit like secluded school.” —Yuka Izutsu of Atelier Delphine

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Benesse House
Naoshima, Japan
“Stay in one of their rooms, and you get to experience a night (or more) in a museum. You can wonder through pieces bu Jasper Johns, Bruce Nauman, and David Hockney late-night or wake up to Hiroshi Sugimoto photographs in the morning while you sip on your macha and look out over the Seto Inland Sea.” —Victoria Cho of Metalepsis Projects

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Bird’s Nest Cabin Rental
Ontario, Wisconsin
“Our go-to nature escape from Chicago is staying in a log cabin in Southwestern Wisconsin. In about four hours, you can be leisurely canoeing down the Kickapoo River as it cuts through cliffs, forested areas, and prairie. These log cabins have fireplaces and smell like you are sleeping in a pine forest. On your way back home, don’t miss out on this hilarious place that sells pretzels as large as your ass with various cheese (duh) and mustard sauces for dipping.” —Sarah Fox of Cursive Design

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Briol
Barbiano, Italy
“The most memorable spot in recent vacation history was at Briol in the Italian Alps—it’s been owned by the same family for a century. You hike up or take a special off-road taxi to the hotel. It has soft pine floors and whitewashed, Bauhaus interiors, communal, delicious dining, and 18-mile hikes.” Kathleen Whitaker

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Cabañas La Conchita
Tulum, Mexico
“It’s a two-story bungalow with hammocks and white sand at your doorstep. The lovely people from the hotel pick bananas to serve at breakfast along with freshly squeezed OJ.” —Tere Artigas of Gabriela Artigas

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Caldera’s Dolphin
Santorini, Greece
“I just booked this—and I can’t wait! The views look amazing, and the hotel is very secluded—which means tons of walking and biking, and we plan to do some sailing. I’m very excited as Greece is my husband’s favorite place on earth!” —Suzan Lambillotte of Lambillotte

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Cave House Rental
Santorini, Greece
“I love visiting Santorini because it’s so quiet and the views are incredible, and I think the best way to do it is renting a local cave house. They are built into the cliffs so you wake up with gorgeous views and a breeze every morning—and can drink local wines while watching the sunset.” —Danielle Ribner of Loup

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Chickasaw Homestead Rental
Joshua Tree, California
“I went there recently with two girlfriends for a spiritual adventure, and one was had. It’s a historic little homestead with Joshua Tree National Park practically in the backyard. One of our favorite moments was discovering that the owner Diane had left us detailed notes about how to handle the tortoise in the front yard—carefully!” —Rammy Park of Wanderluster

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Coqui Coqui
Tulum, Mexico
“I just recently took a trip to Tulum, Mexico, which was incredible. We stayed at the Coqui Coqui—it’s an unpretentious, magical fashion fortress. The rooms are minimal and thoughtfully put-together. Flowy linens, concrete floors, and antique brass fixtures make up the look and meld together seamlessly.  The second-floor, ocean-view rooms are the way to go.” —Corinne Grassini Mathern of Society for Rational Dress

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Costa Navarino
Pilos, Greece
“The hotel is located in the Greek region of Messina and is filled with everything you can imagine for every age possible. From the beautiful view of the water to the swimming pool, slides, outdoor sports and even entertainment like bowling and a movie theater.” —Alexandra Koutsomitis of Alexa Sofia

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El Albergue
Ollantaytambo, Peru
“Located in the Ollantaytambo train station which connects Cusco to Machu Picchu, this spot is perfectly designed and has the most beautiful plants and flowers. They also have an organic farm behind the hotel, so the food is delicious!” —Harper Poe of Proud Mary

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El Copal
Oaxaca, Mexico
“It’s situated on a quiet, private, somewhat-deserted beach on the Oaxacan coast—you can soak up the views of beautiful beach and jungle-like vegetation surrounding the quiet cabins and go to sleep to hypnotizing wave sounds. Another amazing experience at this place is showering outside—the shower is hidden in the woods in your private area!” —Yegang Yoo of IMAGO-A

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Esalen
Big Sur, California
“I did an epic Big Sur road trip, and, at this place, it’s about the hot mineral baths overlooking the crashing waves of the Pacific by moonlight.” —Susan Domelsmith of Dirty Librarian Chains

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Explora Patagonia – Hotel Salto Chico
Torres del Paine National Park, Chile
“To find such an amazing hotel in one of the most scenic parks in the world makes this place totally worth the long trip south.” —Brook Stroud of La Matera

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The Gage Hotel
Marathon, Texas
“I stayed in this amazing, super-traditional ranch-style hotel in Marathon, Texas. The owner re-created its grandeur from the 1920s, and it’s filled with artifacts. The best bit might well have been the view from the lawn chairs on the porch—there is nothing like seeing the stars of a Texas sky at night!” —Bernice Kelly of Macha Jewelry

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The Graham & Co.
Phoenicia, New York
“My girlfriend and I had a super-nice time up there last summer—they show movies on the back lawn, there’s a fruit stand down the road that stays open 24 hours a day, the nearby Peekamoose restaurant is amazing, and one of the best (and hardest to find) swim holes on this planet, the Blue Hole, is close by.” —Matt Singer

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La Mirage Garden Hotel & Spa 
Cotacachi, Ecuador
Summer is the perfect time to visit the Galapagos Islands in Ecuador. While you’re down there, make sure to spend a few nights at this old-school luxury hotel. The décor is Louis XIV-exquisite, with original paintings, canopy beds, petal-strewn pools, and stone-slab baths.” —Pierre Kim of Ivory Row

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La Passion Hotel
Cartagena, Colombia
“The hotel is run by a French artist Thierry Forte who owns a gallery on the first floor. It’s old but faded and torn to perfection. The roof has a dipping pool that nobody seemed to use with a view of Cartagena.” —Grace Chang of Ivory Row

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La Pause
Marrakesh, Morocco
“Lindsay and I went there for a little getaway between antique jewelry buying trips in London and Paris. We rode camels together through remote villages, ate delicious couscous under a gorgeous berber tent, and hung out in the candle-lit rooms, which were luxurious despite the fact that they didn’t have electricity.” —Erica Weiner

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The Lightning Field
Catron County, New Mexico
“Visiting this Walter de Maria land art installation outside of Santa Fe is the most breathtaking, surreal, and humbling experience. You stay out in the middle of the desert, far away from civilization, with 180 degrees of sky and sunrises, sunsets and lightning to keep you entertained.” —Kathryn and Lizzie Fortunato of Lizzie Fortunato

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The Line Hotel
Los Angeles, California
“I got a chance to stay at The Line Hotel when it had just opened. I took a little staycation, hung out, and enjoyed the beautiful view from my room of the Griffith Park Observatory and the Hollywood sign. Chef Roy Choi opened up a lively lobby bar and his latest restaurant, POT, which are both delicious. To complete this hotel’s awesomeness, Poketo opened up their second location in the lobby!” —Sonya Gallardo of HighLow Jewelry

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Loft Rental
Playa Del Carmen, Mexico
“My boyfriend and I went to Playa Del Carmen for my birthday a couple of months ago. We found this incredible place on Airbnb. It was in the jungle, and there were super-cute lemurs playing in the trees outside our window in the mornings!” —Collette Ishiyama

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Macakizi Hotel
Golturkbuku, Turkey
“Nothing beats the comfy cushions, on the chic decks over the beautiful blue Aegean Sea.” —Jill Golden of Flutter by Jill Golden

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Matemwe Bandas
Matemwe, Zanzibar
“It is only three huts on the beach completely made out of palm wood. The owners brought us fresh coconuts and homemade margaritas everyday. It was amazing to see all the local kids playing on the beach right in front of our little porch.” —Jaclyn Mayer of  Orly Genger by Jaclyn Mayer

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Ojai Valley Inn & Spa
Ojai, California
“This is my favorite place to go in California during the summer. It is beautiful over there—a little pricey but so quiet, with a positive energy. We try to get a room where you have the best view of the mountains. At night, you can stay on your balcony to contemplate all the stars in the sky.” —Hortense Bonneau of Hortense Jewelry

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The Prairie
Round Top, Texas
“R&R+ good girl time + vintaging! Rachel Ashwell’s shabby-chic, cozy, and beautiful cottage oasis is great for a low-key road trip.” —Stacy Herzog Berk of frieda&nellie

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The Red Lion Inn
Stockbridge, Massachusetts
“My husband and I went here last fall, and it was such a perfect weekend in a truly beautiful location. The inn dates back to the 18th century and has all the charm to prove it—along with a delicious restaurant and bar service to the front porch. A complete win, all around!” —Nina Glaser of Ash & Anchor

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River Bend Hot Springs
Truth or Consequences, New Mexico
“Truth or Consequences—the name of the town first brought me here almost 10 years ago on a cross-country trip. River Bend Hot Springs is worth a trip in itself—it’s very New-Age-y, with a laser show at night. It’s almost absurd, but the hot springs overlooking the Rio Grande are amazing. It’s a total desert oasis.” —Nettie Kent

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Saruni
Masai Mara, Kenya
“Nestled in the bushes of the Masai Mara, it’s pure magic. There are only a few cottages, with a limit of 14 guests. There are cozy, delicious, fireside meals with people from all over the world and amazingly serene and breathtaking views with baboons, lions, water buffalo, and all sorts of wildlife roaming around your cottage.” —Jennie Kwon

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Sparrows
Palm Springs, California
“My boyfriend and I just did a weekend escape to Palm Springs to thaw out after the winter and stayed at this hotel called Sparrows that recently opened that I LOVED. I almost don’t want to talk about it because I think it might get really crowded and hard to stay there! It’s totally simple and minimal, rustic ranch style, and everything was impeccably done. I wish it was my house!” —Ellen Van Der Laan of Baggu

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Ulu Niu House Rental
Big Island, Hawaii
“I grew up staying in this house on Hawaii’s Big Island every year. Unlike the other islands, the Big Island is covered in black lava fields, which make the landscape seem remote. Wailea Bay is my hidden gem. You’ll find a few campers, locals, and small families scattered along the tucked away sandy, blue beach.” —Sophie Monet Okulick of Sophie Monet

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XVA Art Hotel
Dubai, UAE
“The XVA Art Hotel in Dubai is one of the few boutique hotels in the city: ten rooms in a 100-year-old house built of coral and limestone with three wind towers and a couple of peaceful courtyards filled with contemporary art and trees, right off the Dubai Creek. I love the fresh mint-lemonade slushies at the courtyard cafe and the amazing gift shop that sells clothing, home goods, and souvenirs by local and regional designers.” —Rawaan Alkhatib

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Zion Mountain Ranch  
Zion National Park, Utah
“My guy and I stayed on this buffalo preserve—in our very own cabin—just 5 minutes outside of Zion National Park. They had a farm-to-fork restaurant on-site—the food was AMAZING, just like the views. I can’t wait to go back again.” —Allison Heutsche of Artasan

If you’re looking for more travel tips, you should probably click here.

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City Haul: Where We Eat and Shop in Austin *and* L.A.

This week, Claire and I are headed west. Our itinerary: Austin, L.A., and Vegas. And though we can’t really comment on the latter—you know, what happens in Vegas…—we did want to share the places we’ll be visiting in destinations #1 and #2. In fact! We told Conde Nast Traveler alllll about our go-tos, and so for the full run-down, you best click on through. —erica

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AUSTIN! From tacos at La Condesa (pictured!) to warm-weather-appropriate sweaters from Kick Pleat to oysters as often as we can get them—more here.

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LOS ANGELES! We’re westside girls, and the are the Venice/West Hollywood/Santa Monica/Brentwood—like Tenoversix, shown up there!—that we’re hitting, for surez. This way for the scoop.

For more city-guide madness, click!

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Journey to Colombia and Greece With Alexandra Koutsomitis

Let’s country-hop, shall we?

Alexandra Koutsomitis is a straight-up Manhattan girl, but her multiculti upbringing—her mom’s Colombian, and her dad’s Greek—has influenced her travels and, in turn, the designs for her killer silk scarf line Alexa Sofia. See what the (um, tri-lingual!) designer picked up during her trips to her parents’ birthplaces. —jinnie lee

Colombia

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“La galleria translates to the market. This is a place in Cali in El Barrio Alameda where I try to go every time I visit Colombia. It is similar to a giant flea market, but it is indoors—and they sell anything you could possibly want! There are all different sections including one for fruits and vegetables, one for meats, and another for flowers—the list goes on. The energy and colors of the market make you want to buy everything. It’s the kind of place that you always want to come back to.”

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“This painting is going to be made into a scarf for my next collection, so be on the lookout!”

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“Molas are Colombian tapestries that are hand-woven and designed by the Kuna people. They are beautifully intricate with incredible attention to detail and color. Molas are so beautiful and inspirational that I have framed some and have them hanging around my house.”

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“I started making clutches and pillows made out of hammock material from Colombia. It is sturdy and durable—it also comes in beautiful, bright colors.”

Greece

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“This is almost the whole family except for my mother, who is taking the picture. We are sitting in front of the most iconic traditional piece of architecture ever, the Acropolis. It’s one of most inspirational places—from how it was built to the intricacies of the details.”

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“The beaches of Greece are so magical that they look like they are out of a dream. They are not like any other beaches you have ever seen. The color is magnificent and is the inspiration for a lot of my artwork. It is so clear that you can see everything that is below you. All those fish and octopi you see swimming around are really incredible. This photo is from a beautiful beach called Myrtos in Kefalonia.”

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“I painted this fish piece on loose canvas with oil paints. The inspirations for my fish paintings come from seeing sea creatures outside of restaurants near the water. The colors of all the different fish are what really attracts me to paint them.”

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“This is a small part of my collection of evil eyes that I bought in Greece—it is a well-known symbol that keeps evil spirits away. You can find them all over my house.”

Alexa’s new edition is so flipping fun—check it out now.

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Scope Out Caroline Ventura’s Top 5 Travel Destinations

Start saving your vacation days.

Caroline Ventura, behind the ultra-understated line Brvtvs, is a jewelry whiz, but she’s also a traveler extraordinaire—seriously, her Instagram, bursting with shots of stunning docks and island huts, never fails to make us jelly. So where would she go if she could go anywhere? Explore her favorite locales below. —alisha prakash

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San Miguel de Allende, Mexico
“The architecture is unbelievably beautiful. All the houses face the street and seem unassuming at first, but those giant wooden doors open into some lush courtyards filled with gardens and fountains. It feels like an old colonial Spanish town, with its cobblestone streets and brightly painted facades.”
Protip: “Go have lunch at El Correo. It’s the best tortilla soup I have ever had. Ever.”

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Northern Morocco
“Last summer, my husband and I drove around Northern Morocco for ten days. It is the one trip that stands out in my mind as my favorite. This is just a regular ol’ water fountain in Fes—with that tile, on a drinking fountain.”
Protip: “If you find yourself in Fes and can manage to find your way around the Medina (you’ll get lost—it’s an insane maze that is next to impossible to navigate, but that’s half the fun), go to the Palais Amani and treat yourself to their hammam (spa!).”

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Rome, Italy
“I fell hard for Rome when I took a family vacation there when I was 11, and it has been a torrid love affair ever since. The ancientness of this city gets me every time. I love it so much that I named my jewelry line after one of the Empire’s most notorious characters.”
Protip: “One of my favorite memories is from the first time I visited. My parents and I got stuck in a rainstorm and had to take shelter in a teeny little restaurant on the northeast corner of Piazza Navona. It was the first time I tried spaghetti carbonara, and it’s been one of my favorites ever since.”

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Portland, Maine
“There is something about the air up in Maine that is otherworldly. It makes your lungs feel alive. I’ve visited Portland a few times and really love that it feels like a quaint little fishing village but has a bit of a city vibe to it.”
Protip: “My favorite place to go to in Maine is Eventide Oyster Co. You can’t go wrong with anything on their menu, seeing as it was probably plucked from the ocean that morning. Splitting a dozen oysters and a martini is the best way to start a meal there.”

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Tofino, Canada
“Tofino is like the Maine of the West Coast. I can’t think of any other way of describing it than, ‘Shit, this place is bananas.’ You have to take a teeny propeller plane to get to the island, so if you’re afraid of flying, maybe pack some valium because my pilot liked to swoop down along the mountains as we were coming in, which was awesome. Second, bring lots of film (or an extra memory card) because you won’t be able to put your camera down.”
Protip: “Book a room at the Wickaninnish Inn. I was lucky enough to stay here as part of a job I was working on, and this place is incredible. Bathtub in the bedroom—enough said.”

Caroline’s new ball chain earrings are MAJ—check ‘em out now!

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Get Outta Town: 52 Designer-Fueled Travel Guides That’ll Help You Plan a Great Escape

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Harper Poe of Proud Mary will show you the way…

Are you looking for someone to lead you to the best junk barns in Maine or the coolest bars in Buenos Aires? Well, YOU’VE COME TO THE RIGHT PLACE. Below, insider-y tips for trips around the world—one for each week of the year, even—alphabetized for your scrolling pleasure. —erica

+ Arcosanti, Arizona, with Yuka Izutsu of Atelier Delphine

+ Astoria, Queens, with Lindsey Lambillotte of Lambillotte

+ Austin with Katie Kime

+ Austin with Susan Domelsmith of Dirty Librarian Chains

+ Big Sur with Sophie Monet

+ Buenos Aires with Jennie Engelhardt and Emily Harrison of Hare+Hart

+ Charleston with Harper Poe of Proud Mary

+ Chicago with Laura Lombardi

+ Copenhagen with Erica

+ Florence with Meredith and Wendell German of Meredith Wendell

+ Flushing, Queens, with Phoebe Sung and Peter Buer of Cold Picnic

+ Halifax, Nova Scotia, with Kaelen Haworth of Kaelen

+ Hong Kong with Jade Lai of Creatures of Comfort

+ Joshua Tree with Hillary Taymour of Collina Strada

+ L.A. with Albert Chu of Otaat

+ L.A. with Elena Coleman Howell of TOMTOM

+ L.A. with Kathryn Bentley of Dream Collective

+ L.A.’s Koreatown with Grace Lee

+ L.A.’s Silverlake with Clare Vivier

+ Maine with Erica Weiner

+ Mexico City with Monica Ruzansky of AILI

+ Montreal with Caroline Ventura of Brvtvs

+ Northern California with Kindah Khalidy

+ NYC with Graciela Fuentes of Tirana Jewelry

+ NYC’s Chinatown with Maxandra Short, formerly of Kora

+ NYC’s East Village with Mandy Coon

+ NYC’s Far West Soho with Matt Singer

+ NYC’s Garment District with Samantha Pleet

+ NYC’s Lower East Side with Szeki Chan of 7115

+ NYC’s Upper West Side with Jacob Melinger and Alan Paukman of Nikolai Rose

+ Oakland with Ali Golden

+ Oakland with Lauren Wolf

+ Paris with Gigi Burris

+ Paris with Hortense Bonneau of Hortense Jewelry

+ Pisa with Laura Lombardi

+ Portland, Oregon, with Caesy Oney of Draught Dry Goods

+ Portland, Oregon, with Sara Dudzinsky of Better Late Than Never

+ Prague with Lizz Wasserman of Popomomo

+ Puerto Vallarta with Breanna Musgrove of Scout & Catalogue

+ Richmond, Virginia, with Rachel Albright of Academy Jewelry

+ Rockaway Beach with Sara Gates of Cook & Gates

+ San Francisco with Elizabeth Yarborough of Yarbie

+ San Francisco with Noah Guy of Joshu+Vela

+ San Francisco’s Mission District with Ryan DeBonville

+ Savannah with Elizabeth Thompson of Elizabeth Knight

+ Seattle with Jamie Iacoli and Brian McAllister of Iacoli & McAllister

+ Steamboat Springs, Colorado, with Sam Shipley and Jeff Halmos of Shipley & Halmos

+ Southern California with Tim Morse of Richer Poorer

+ Toronto with Tara-Lynn Morrison of Good Night, Day

+ Tulum with Claire

+ Williamsburg, Brooklyn, with Caitlin Mociun of Mociun

+ Williamsburg, Brooklyn, with Lynne Hiriak of Cardigan

 Bookmark this link to stay up on the latest city guides!

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Dane Glorious: 9 Places Erica Thinks You’ve Gotta Go in Copenhagen

You guys! I just got back from Copenhagen. Like, on Sunday. My fiancé and I chilled there for a week (before he started a three-week-long econometrics course—yah, whoa—at the university there). The city’s as nice and liveable and design-y and delicious as you’ve heard it is. And while it’s all so FRESH IN MY MIND, I wanted to share the spots I think you should most definitely hit—besides Rundetårn, Tivoli, Christiania, and the other guide-book classics—if you’re in the market for a Scandinavian adventure. erica

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Meyers: Quickly became our who-cares-about-health-on-vacation breakfast spot.

Meyers Bageri
Word is, the hindbærsnitter—described by Bon Appetit as the best raspberry Pop-Tart ever—is where it’s at, but our vote goes to the thing that looks like cinnamon focaccia, which puts Cinnabon to shame. The bakery’s on this cute cobblestoned street Jægersborggade in the city’s Nørrebro neighborhood, where we stayed. And it’s like a two-minute walk to Assistens Kirkegard—the cemetery where Hans Christian Andersen and Søren Kierkegaard are buried that’s a prime spot for picnicking.
(Jægersborggade 9)

Ruby
Cocktails! Delicious ones! We went early and sat at the bar and watched the boats on the canal. The Summer and Ale was awesome (gin + cynar + elderflower + lemon + IPA), and there was a drink involving fresh passion fruit that—shhh—was not on the menu.
(Nybrogade 10)

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Yes, I’m ready to move into the Hay shop.

Hay
DANG. If Japan’s Muji and France’s Merci had a little Before Sunrise-style encounter in Denmark, you’d get Hay. This 10-year-old design company has a couple of outposts around town, but go to the sun-drenched, two-story one called Hay House, and let me know how many tea towels, office supplies, and little glasses you take home—and how many pieces of furniture you mourn having to leave behind.
(Østergade 61)

Relæ
No, we didn’t go to Noma—so stop asking. We did, however, throw down for Relæ, which is from one of the vaunted restaurant’s alums (who also cooked at El Bulli, NBD). One bite into a dish of mind-blowingly delicious cooked sunflower seeds, and we knew we’d made the right decision.
(Jaegersborggade 41)

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Mikkeller has some good labels, huh?

Mikkeller & Friends
This does not feel like a beer bar at all—and that’s a total compliment. It’s open and airy, all pale wood and seafoam. Oh, yah, and there are 40 beers on tap from the super-buzzy brewery and its, you know, friends. While you’re there, you have to go to the attached shop to see all the pretty bottles.
(Stefansgade 35)

Amager Strandpark
You know what I learned? That Danes really love a suntan, and that they all hop on their bikes and head to this city beach when they have some free time. When we went, there was a farm stand selling watermelon wedges that really hit the spot.

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Just a diving board reaching out toward the water that the Lousiana.

Louisiana Museum of Modern Art
The artwork here’s top-notch (Yves Klein, Henry Moore, Picasso), but it’s the setting that makes is absolutely worth the 45-minute trip outside the city. It’s right on the ocean with these ridiculously manicured lawns—a definition-of-picturesque sort of thing. Bring a lunch and sit on the grass or get in line for the classy-looking buffet, which was mobbed by noon.
(Gl Strandvej 13, 3050 Humlebæk)

Kødbyens Fiskebar
Don’t let the big cow presiding over the place confuse you: This is a fish spot. It’s in the meatpacking district—where there are actually still butcher shops, not just bars—and that setting gives it a more chilled-out vibe than it might otherwise have. There are canvas lawn chairs for drinking in the parking lot, and the mussels are really, really killer.
(Marnixplaats 12)

Klassik Moderne Møbelkunst
Just before we headed to this spot, we hit the Designmuseum Danmark, and, IMHO, this shop was way more enlightening on the Danish modernism front. There are tons of impeccable pieces from Hans J. Wegner and Poul Henningsen (superstars in that world), and the catalog the store puts out provides an impressive amount of history and context.
(Bredgade 3)

Tips & Tricks

+ Rent a bike. It’s shocking how much easier (slash safer) cycling is in this city than in NYC. Even the locks are simpler. My ride ran about $15/day.

+ Everyplace takes debit cards, but credit cards—that’s another story. It’s technically possible, but it requires a whole conversation each time you go to pay with plastic sans PIN.

+ We didn’t encounter a single person who didn’t speak English, and thank god: How to pronounce anything besides “thank you” in Danish remains a mystery to me.

+ Copenhagen = not cheap. At all. Save yo’ pennies.

Have other travel plans in the works? Check out these city guides…

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Behind the Road Trip That Inspired Kain Label’s Entire Summer Collection

How seventeen states and one Road Warrior RV led to some totally awesome designs.

Family road trips have the potential to really suck, but Amanda and Melanie Kain, the sister act behind the sleek, comfy clothing line Kain Label, know how to do it right. Check out eight of the truly amazing places the girls stopped on the cross-country adventure that fueled their latest collection. —monica derevjanik 

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Mill Run
Melanie: “We traveled through Pittsburgh for the Andy Warhol Museum before heading to Fallingwater in Mill Run, Pennsylvania—a house designed by Frank Lloyd Wright. It was built between 1936 and 1939, but it feels like a historical and contemporary house. The details and innovations he incorporated into the house show how forward-thinking he was. We loved the natural light and the burnt browns and Cherokee red seen throughout.”

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Charleston
Amanda: “Charleston really makes you feel that you have arrived to the genteel South. We saw dear friends get married, and the walk to the church led us right through Charleston’s gorgeous historic district at dusk. We spent the next day not hurrying anything: brunch at Husk Restaurant, a stop into Billy Reid, and a mosey around Meeting Street. That night we drove out to Folly Beach for an authentic low-country boil at The Crab Shack. We sat outside, ordered strong Long Island Iced Teas, and got seriously messy peeling shrimp and cracking crab claws.”  

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Savannah
Melanie: “We toured the historic district during a very wet Southern storm. Luckily, it turned sunny a half hour later, and the dripping gardens started to shine. The Savannah College of Art & Design store cannot be missed—everything inside is made by current and former students. Broughton Street is also great for shopping. We found an amazing oversize photograph at Sylvester & Co. We took a drive to Tybee Island to catch a glimpse of Cockspur Island Lighthouse and Tybee Island Lighthouse.”

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Atlanta
Amanda: “We spent a wonderful day at the Georgia Aquarium with our four-year-old niece. Out of all the incredible regional food we sampled, the hands-down best dinner of the trip was at Hugh Acheson’s Empire State South. From the In Jars starter to the decadent Georgia Coffee, it was all damn good.”  

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Louisiana Bayou
Melanie: “We had been to New Orleans before, so this time we went looking for an authentic bayou experience. Our day started with lunch at Bayou Delight, where we sat on the patio a bit nervously next to a sign that read: ‘CAUTION Alligators in Bayou; Please Do Not Feed The Alligators.’ We booked an airboat tour for the afternoon with the most hilariously endearing character named Junior. He mostly does tours in the gator-hunting off-season—and only when he feels like it. We were completely blown away by the wildlife and changing landscape. We didn’t see anyone else on the bayou, which only increased the feeling that we had entered into another, surreal world.”

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Marfa
Amanda: “Marfa is a total badass mix of abstract, modern art set against the unrelenting Texas prairie landscape—you can feel the landscape getting more intense the longer you stay. We first fueled up for the day with breakfast burritos at Marfa Burrito, which is two Mexican ladies cooking in their home. Then it was off to see Donald Judd’s collection and the public museum he founded, The Chinati Foundation. The best way to see it is with Ralph as your guide. His passion is a slow burn, but he will keep your energy steady for the whole day. Later, we bought vintage Bolivian blankets at the gift shop at El Cosmico, where you can stay in teepees or airstream trailers.”

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Santa Fe
Melanie: “The Land of Enchantment, indeed. Santa Fe is simply a happy place. The air in the city is already extremely fresh; driving up into the hills is a complete high. On our first morning, we stopped to buy chiles and dried lavender bunches at the farmers’ market and visited the French linen store Bon Marche at the Railyard. We spent the afternoon getting hot-stone massages and body scrubs at Ten Thousand Waves, a Japanese spa high up in the mountains above the city. Then it was off to Shiprock, which we learned about from Fathom, to check out the exquisite Native American-inspired jewelry, textiles, and vintage Chieftain blankets.”

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Mesa Verde National Park and Monument Valley
Amanda: “The drive from Santa Fe to Los Angeles had the most natural beauty of the entire trip. The Mesa Verde National Park in Colorado has over 5,000 ancient Pueblo ruins that date back to 600 A.D. With park rangers, you climb down from the flat mesa top into the canyons to see the ruins. Monument Valley is Navajo Nation land. We stayed on the Utah side and traveled into the Arizona Valley with a Navajo guide. We spent the day in an open-top jeep to view the mesas and buttes, some of which stand 1,000 feet. Our guide’s personal history really made the day. At the end of the tour, he showed us his family’s hogan, which is the Navajo’s sacred home. It seemed like an appropriate last stop before making for home ourselves.”

You’re going to love what Amanda and Melanie did with all this inspiration!

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The Giveaway: Your Last Chance to Win $250 Worth of Travel-Ready Skincare c/o Fathom!

Do you like to get out of town? Do you know Fathom? If not, get it together: It’s just our very favorite resource for vacation, well, everything. And if you sign up for their newsletter today, you might just win a boatload of Earth Tu Face beauty goodness that’ll keep your skin all fresh and dewy after a run-in with airplane A/C. —erica

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